Archive for June, 2012


[Telegraph] It can be cheaper to park a plane at an airport than a car, new research suggests.

Manchester Airport:  "Aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues".  Photo: Wikimedia

Manchester Airport: “Aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues”. Photo: Wikimedia

A study of 10 of Britain’s busiest airports shows that it could be cheaper to leave a light aircraft for a day at an airport than it would be to leave a car for the same amount of time.

The report cites Heathrow Terminal 5 as the most expensive, with a rate of £51.80 for a car to stay for 24 hours in the short-stay car park – although a Telegraph Travel query showed that the long-stay car park would cost £17.90 for the same time if booked in advance.

Manchester Airport charges £35 for a full day in a short-stay car park while a six-seater light aircraft would cost just £21 for the same period.

At Liverpool’s John Lennon Airport, the difference in parking costs was even wider, the study suggested, citing £10.72 as the price for a light aircraft compared to £39.99 for a car.

At Edinburgh airport it costs £23.50 to park a car and £11.90 to park a plane for 24 hours.

At Glasgow airport it is £21 for a car, and £11.52 for a plane. At Birmingham it is £22.50 for a car and £10.80 for a plane, while at Bristol it is £25 for a car and £17 for a plane.

Only at Luton Airport is plane parking more expensive than car parking, at £38.88 against £36 for a car.

Russell Craig of Manchester airport told the Independent, which conducted the study: “Years ago airports made all their money from the planes. Now at Manchester, aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues. To be able to keep investing, you’ve got to find new revenue streams and some of that is car parking. But pre-booking is the way to save money. The turn-up prices are what they are.”

Paul Watters of the AA said: “These are incredible findings that sadly may not come as a surprise to drivers who often have to pay eye-watering sums for parking in……

Read the full story at The Daily Telegraph….


By 
29th June, 2012



[Mirror] Policemen were fired on by two fellow officers suspected of working for drug traffickers at Mexico City international airport.

Travellers dived for cover as shots were fired between the suspects and cops

Travellers dived for cover as shots were fired between the suspects and cops

Three policeman have been shot dead in a shootout between police officers suspected of working for drug traffickers at Mexico City airport. Travellers dived for cover as shots were fired between the suspects and cops who had arrived at terminal 2 to arrest them.

Two officers died at the scene and another died later of his wounds at a local hospital. 

The federal Attorney General’s office said that its organized crime unit had opened an investigation into the case. The shootings occurred around the food court, near the area where vehicles drop off passengers but well outside the internal security checkpoints where workers and passengers are screened.

Witness Israel Lopez, a 23-year-old Mexico City student who had gone to the airport to see off a friend, said that three shots rang out at first.

Lopez didn’t see who those shots were directed at, but……

Read the full story at The Daily Mirror…..


By Agency staff
26 Jun 2012



[Telegraph]  Gatwick Airport will resurrect proposals for a second runway this summer as it ramps up efforts to become London’s main gateway to booming economies in Asia.

GIP will publish a “master plan” next month setting out what the airport will look like in eight years’ time.

GIP will publish a “master plan” next month setting out what the airport will look like in eight years’ time.

Details of the airport’s plans have emerged as its chief executive, Stewart Wingate, blamed rival Heathrow for giving foreign airlines a false impression that London was “closed for business”.

Gatwick, which has been owned by Global Infrastructure Partners since 2009, will publish a “master plan” next month setting out what the airport will look like in eight years’ time.

The airport’s bosses will also float two scenarios for how it could develop after 2020 – including the case for a two-runway airport.

In an interview with The Sunday Telegraph, Mr Wingate said a second runway at Gatwick or Stansted would be less problematic – and costly – than either a new airport in the Thames Estuary or expansion at Heathrow.

The costs of building “Boris Island” seemed “prohibitively expensive”, he said, while a third Heathrow runway could cost in the region of £10bn-£15bn.

More people would be affected by the noise created by an enlarged Heathrow than at Gatwick or Stansted, the former BAA director added.

“There’s a noise contour which says that in and around Heathrow there’s about a quarter of a million people that live very close to…….

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..


By
9:30PM BST 23 Jun 2012



 [Independant] Heathrow‘s capacity problems could be solved without the need for a new runway, as strict rules on take-offs and landings are eased from next month.

The plan could allow 120,000 extra aircraft movements each year at Europe's busiest airport.

The plan could allow 120,000 extra aircraft movements each year at Europe’s busiest airport.

The “silver bullet” solution to the airport’s congestion crisis could unlock up to 25 per cent more slots with no extra building. Introducing so-called “mixed mode” flying – under which runways are used for both take-offs and landings at the same time – could allow 120,000 extra aircraft movements each year at Europe’s busiest airport.This would call into question the need for either a third runway or an entirely new airport in the Thames Estuary. New rules coming into force on 1 July will increase the number of circumstances in which simultaneous runway use is permitted. Heathrow says this will not for now lead to a net increase in slots, but it is under pressure from the airline industry to extend the scheme to allow more take-offs and landings.

The fact that the Department for Transport has agreed to tinker with long-standing rules against “mixed mode” indicates they may be willing to overrule local residents’ objections.

How a mixed mode runway operation works

Steve Ridgway, the chief executive of Virgin Atlantic, told The Independent: “Mixed mode … would allow a more efficient use of the existing, overstretched runways at Heathrow.”

When working to full capacity – which it does much of the time – Heathrow can handle up to 44 departures and 43 arrivals every hour. Yet its nearest rival is even more productive: Gatwick is the world’s busiest single-runway airport by a wide margin, with up to 54 movements an hour.

A study carried out by the air-traffic provider NATS concluded mixed mode could boost Heathrow’s capacity by up to 15 per cent – adding 10 million passengers to today’s annual total of 70 million. But a spokesperson for NATS said the operating changes needed to achieve that increase would require……

Read the full story at The Independant…..


Story by Simon Calder
23rd June, 2012



[BBC News] The budget airline Ryanair has launched another attempt to buy its biggest Irish rival Aer Lingus.

Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary said: "This offer represents a significant opportunity to combine Aer Lingus with Ryanair.... Photo:  Wikipedia

Michael O’Leary said: “This offer represents a significant opportunity to combine Aer Lingus with Ryanair.   Photo: Wikipedia

Ryanair says it plans to make a cash offer for Aer Lingus, which would value it at 694m euros ($883m; £561m). Ryanair will make the offer through a subsidiary called Coinside.

Ryanair already owns 30% of Aer Lingus.

On Monday, Ryanair’s existing holding was referred to the UK’s Competition Commission for a probe that could lead to it being forced to sell the stake.

When Ryanair tried to buy Aer Lingus in 2006, its attempt was blocked by the European Commission.

It said the 1.30 euro offer was a premium of 38.3% above Tuesday’s Aer Lingus closing price.

Ryanair chief executive Michael O’Leary said: “This offer represents a significant opportunity to combine Aer Lingus with Ryanair, to form one strong Irish airline group capable of competing with Europe’s other major airline groups……

Read the full story at BBC News……

 


BBC News
19th June, 2012



[Telegraph] Boris Johnson has called for a second runway to be built at Stansted as the gulf between the London Mayor and David Cameron widened on aviation.

”Boris thinks it is time that we looked at all the options around London because the Heathrow option is politically undeliverable"

”Boris thinks it is time that we looked at all the options around London because the Heathrow option is politically undeliverable”. Photo: Wikikpedia

Mr Johnson rounded on the Prime Minister and the Coalition which has refused to consider expanding Heathrow as well as vetoing proposals for new runways at Gatwick and Stansted.

Having earlier pushed for the building of a new airport in the Thames Estuary, Mr Johnson called for a second runway at Stansted to be built as a short term fix.

He also said that £14.8 billion Crossrail scheme, which will link the City to Heathrow, should be extended to Stansted.

“It would be a good interim solution,” he said. “A lot of money is now moving on to Stansted and the possibility of a high-speed rail link up there. You could be just as fast, if not faster, than at Heathrow.

”I think it is time that we looked at all the options around London because the Heathrow option is politically undeliverable and would be an environmental disaster.

Read the full story at The Telegraph…….


By
6:12PM BST 18 Jun 2012



[Travel Weekly] Monarch Airlines Group has appointed two senior aviation figures to the company’s board. Former Civil Aviation Authority chairman Sir Roy McNulty and former head of British Midland (BMI) Austin Reid will join Monarch in July as non-executive directors.

iain Rawlinson, Monarch Group Executive chairman, said: “These appointments significantly strengthen the governance and leadership team of Monarch

iain Rawlinson, Monarch Group Executive chairman, said: “These appointments significantly strengthen the governance and leadership team of Monarch. Photo: Wikipedia

McNulty is currently deputy chairman of the Olympic Delivery Authority and a non-executive director of Gatwick Airport.

He was chairman of CAA until 2009 after previously heading the air traffic control body, National Air Traffic Services (Nats).

Prior to that McNulty ran Belfast-based aerospace company Short Brothers as chief executive and chairman. Short Brothers is now part of Bombardier.

Austin Reid held executive roles at BMI from 1985 to 2005, heading the airline as managing director and chief executive for a decade. He is currently a non-executive director of SR Technics.

Monarch also announced the appointment of Richard Roth as group director of performance management and turnaround from today. Roth is former chief financial officer of private jet operator Royal Jet, based in Abu Dhabi, and has previously worked at easyJet.

Iain Rawlinson, Monarch Group executive chairman, said: “These appointments significantly strengthen the governance and leadership team of Monarch as we continue to modernise the group and execute our turnaround plan.

“We remain on target operationally and financially.”

Read the original story at Travel Weekly…..


Travel Weekly
18th June, 2012



[Independant] Two suspected Fathers 4 Justice protesters sparked alarm when they breached Heathrow Airport security fences while planes were taking off and landing today.

A similar attempt was made by the protest group to access the airfield in 2009. Photo BAA

A similar attempt was made by the protest group to access the airfield in 2009

Passengers waiting to disembark flights around 1.30pm said they were held on the tarmac as police rushed to arrest the pair. But a BAA spokeswoman said no disruption was caused to flight schedules.

“Two individuals, believed to be from Fathers 4 Justice, breeched the perimeter fence at Heathrow airport and were quickly apprehended,” she said.

‘Fathers 4 Justice’ campaigners

Two Fathers 4 Justice protesters were arrested after unsuccessfully attempting to access the airfield in 2009.

Read the riginal story at The Independant…..


Story Sam Masters

17th June, 2012



[Irish Examiner] The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) in the UK has referred Ryanair‘s stake in Aer Lingus to the Competition Commission.

Ryanair had sought to stop the investigation

Ryanair had sought to stop the investigation: Irish Examiner

The Commission has the power to force the low-cost carrier to sell-down its almost 30% stake in the airline, if it has found to be anti-competitive.

The OFT began its investigation two years ago and has found that Ryanair’s stake may give it the ability to exercise material influence over commercial policy at Aer Lingus.

It said that Ryanair has the ability to weaken Aer Lingus as a competitor and that its shareholding may confine Aer Lingus investment options.

As a result, it has now moved the case to the Competition Commission.

Ryanair had sought to stop the investigation, but this was dismissed by the UK Court of Appeal last month.

Read the original story at The Irish Examiner…..


The Irish Examiner
17th June



[Financial Times] David Cameron has paved the way for a U-turn on building a third runway at  Heathrow airport, amid signs that Downing Street is cooling to the idea of  building a new  hub in the Thames Estuary.

Mr Cameron and Mr Osborne were initially attracted to the idea of building a  hub airport with four runways in the Thames estuary

Mr Cameron and Mr Osborne were initially attracted to the idea of building a hub airport with four runways in the Thames estuary. Photo: Wikipedia

Mr Cameron left open the prospect that the Conservatives would campaign at the  2015 election in favour of expanding Heathrow – a move that would please the  business lobby but infuriate environmentalists and Londoners living under the  flight path.

Although the coalition deal with the Liberal Democrats excludes building  another runway at Heathrow, the prime minister believes there is an urgent need  to develop London’s air links with emerging markets.

Questioned in the Commons, Mr Cameron refused to rule out a change of heart.  While restating the coalition’s position, he said: “We must not be blind to two  important considerations: how we expand airport capacity overall and how we  ensure Heathrow operates better.”

Government insiders confirmed that both Mr Cameron and George Osborne, the  chancellor, had an open mind on expanding Heathrow, although any change of  policy would not come before the election.

Zac Goldsmith, the environmentalist and Tory MP for Richmond Park, said that  up to 2m people living under the flight path – including his constituents – would resist a new runway, adding: “I could not stand on a Conservative platform  that included an expansion of Heathrow.”

Mr Cameron and Mr Osborne were initially attracted to the idea of building a  hub airport with four runways in the Thames estuary. But their enthusiasm has  waned as details have emerged on…..

Read the full story at the Financial Times


George Parker and Andrew Parker
14th June, 2012

Additional reporting by James Pickford and Jim Pickard