Archive for February, 2014


[Airport Informer] Struggling Australian carrier Qantas on Tuesday said it was committed to slashing costs by Aus$2 billion (US$1.8 billion) but refused to confirm or deny a report that it will axe 5,000 jobs.

A Qanta Boeing 747 on final approach to Heathrow Airport. photo: Courtesy Wikipedia

he airline has been battling record fuel costs and fierce competition from subsidized rivals and in December said 1,000 jobs would go while warning it faced a half-year loss of up to Aus$300 million.

Its interim result is due on Thursday and the Sydney Daily Telegraph, citing a Qantas source, said the job losses would be much worse as the airline restructures its finances to convince the government it deserves a debt guarantee.

As well as sacking 5,000 staff, the newspaper said Qantas may sell some of its terminals, while The Australian reported it would accelerate the retirement of older planes and defer new orders.

The airline refused to go into details.

Read the full story at Business Insider Australia here….


Business insider
24th Feb, 2014


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[BBC News] Airline pilots are taking legal action following claims they are suffering from a condition known as ‘aerotoxic syndrome‘ caused by the inhalation of engine fumes.

Inside Out spoke to several pilots who claim that the condition has damaged their health and ability to fly.

Dr Jenny Goodman, an expert in environmental medicine, and Dr Michel Mulder, an aviation medical consultant, believe toxins in aircraft are the reason the pilots became ill.

But the medical establishment and civil aviation authorities refute their claims that aircraft toxins can damage the nervous system.

The Department for Transport says there is no conclusive proof that cabin air exposures cause ill health in commercial aircraft crews, whether in general or during ‘fume’ incidents.

Read the full story at BBC News…..

Read more about Aerotoxic Syndrome here…. aerotoxic.org


BBC News
17th Jan, 2014


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[Metro] Heathrow Airport has denied claims four planes in British airspace made ‘mayday’ distress calls as they came close to running out of fuel while battling gale-force winds.

Planes that were unable to land at either Gatwick or Heathrow on Friday were diverted to Manchester and met by emergency response teams.

It had been reported by the Sunday Times that three of the four planes made distress calls after they thought their reserve fuel was coming to an end.

In addition, it was thought that another, an American Airlines flight, had experienced problems with its rudder.

However, a spokesperson for Heathrow said this morning: ‘The story in the Sunday Times is untrue. There were no mayday or distress calls received at Heathrow.

‘Due to high cross winds some aircraft were diverted to other UK airports that have spare runway capacity.’

Read the full story at Metro……


BBC News
17th Jan, 2014


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