Archive for the ‘Asia’ Category


[Stuff.co.nz] Despite increased security travel measures around the world, one woman managed to board the wrong plane, with the wrong airline – all under the wrong name.

Despite the fact that she was travelling under a different name, on passenger was able to board a Cathay Pacific plane.

According to The South China Morning Post, the incident happened at Taiwan Airport when a woman, known as “Ms Hong” was flying to Hong Kong.

The first error in the series of incredible events happened when she checked into the Cathay Pacific desk – instead of Hong Kong Airlines.

Despite checking in with the wrong carrier, Hong was processed. She was also holding a boarding pass that belonged to a man with the same surname, also flying to Hong Kong.

The flights had been booked by Hong’s boyfriend who was told his partner had not boarded her Hong Kong Airlines flight.

SCMP reports that the woman was furious.

“The name on the air ticket wasn’t me. Even the sex on the air ticket was not right. This is ridiculous,” she said.

Cathay Pacific and Hong Kong Airlines have since come together to ensure Hong made a safe return trip, she was also given the use of Cathay’s executive lounge.

A spokesperson for Cathay Pacific confirmed there had been an ……

Read the full story at Stuff.co.nz….


Stuff.co.nz
27th February, 2016


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[NBCCHICARGO.COM] A cyber security expert tells NBC5 Investigates he has found a way to hack into the satellite communications systems used in multiple industries.

“These devices are wide open right now,” said Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant based in Madrid, Spain with IOActive.

"For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels," said Santamarta

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. Image: nbcchicargo.com

Pilots, ship captains and military personnel rely on satellite networks to communicate when there are no phone lines or wireless networks available.

“If someone can see the password or that user name it’s over,” he added. “Those vulnerabilities can be exploited to remotely compromise those devices.

Santamarta said he used something called reverse engineering — or decoding — to hack satellite communications equipment used in aerospace, maritime and military industries.

“In the military sector they use satellite terminals for combat units,” said Santamarta. “They normally encrypt the radio [transmissions] they send. But we can disrupt the satellite communications channel so we can prevent combat units [from asking] for help if they are being attacked.”

And in the maritime sector, satellite communications are used to send and receive vital information that affects the safety of the crew.

“If they are being attacked by terrorists, or they are suffering fire, they can send a distress call,” he said. “But we found we can modify the firmware in some of those terminals, so we can prevent a crew from sending a distress call.”

Santamarta recently published a 25-page report and went public with his findings at Defcon 22 – the largest hacking conference in the world – held earlier this month in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. “In some cases you need physical access to compromise the devices we analyzed, but in other cases you can use Wi-Fi or the entertainment network to access that device.”

His research took place in a lab setting and has not been tested on an actual commercial plane. But his findings have raised concerns in the aviation industry.

Read the full story at NBCCHICARGO.OM here….

 


NBCCHICARGO.COM
21st August, 2014


 

 

 


[Euractiv.com] Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev threatened on Tuesday (5 August) to retaliate for the grounding of a subsidiary of national airline Aeroflot because of EU sanctions, with one newspaper reporting that European flights to Asia over Siberia could be banned.

Low-cost carrier Dobrolyot, operated by Aeroflot, suspended all flights last week after its airline leasing agreement was cancelled under European Union sanctions because it flies to Crimea, a region Russia annexed from Ukraine in March.

“We should discuss possible retaliation,” Medvedev said at a meeting with the Russian transport minister and a deputy chief executive of Aeroflot.

The business daily Vedomosti reported that Russia may restrict or ban European airlines from flying over Siberia on Asian routes, a move that would impose costs on European carriers by making flights take longer and require more fuel.

Vedomosti quoted unnamed sources as saying the foreign and transport ministries were discussing the action, which would put European carriers at a disadvantage to Asian rivals but would also cost Russia money it collects in overflight fees.

Shares in Aeroflot – which according to Vedomosti gets around $300 million a year in fees paid by foreign airlines flying over Siberia – tumbled after the report, closing down 5.9% compared with a 1.4% drop on the broad index.

Siberia ban would force EU carriers into costly detours

At the height of the Cold War, most Western airlines were barred from flying through Russian airspace to Asian cities, and instead had to operate via the Gulf or the US airport of Anchorage, Alaska on the polar route.

European carriers now fly over Siberia on their rapidly growing routes to countries such as China, Japan and South Korea, paying the fees which have been subject to a long dispute between Brussels and Moscow.

Vedomosti quoted one source as saying a ban could cost airlines like Lufthansa, British Airways and Air France €1 billion over three months, but industry experts said that figure was probably too high.

Avoiding Russian airspace would probably be 25-50% more expensive than paying fees for transit, said Russian aviation consultant Boris Ryabok, estimating European airlines would lose around $100-200 million per year, less than the cost to Russia of the lost fees.

Lufthansa said it operates about 180 flights a week through Siberian airspace but declined further comment, as did British Airways.

The EU has widened its sanctions after last month’s downing of a Malaysian airliner over territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Moscow rebels, with the loss of 298 lives.

 

Read the full story at Euractiv.com…..

 


Euactiv.com
6th Aug, 2014



[World Bulletin] Cybersecurity researcher Ruben Santamarta says he has figured out how to hack the satellite communications equipment on passenger jets through their WiFi and in-flight entertainment systems – a claim that, if confirmed, could prompt a review of aircraft security.

“In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications”

Santamarta, a consultant with cybersecurity firm IOActive, is scheduled to lay out the technical details of his research at this week’s Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas, an annual convention where thousands of hackers and security experts meet to discuss emerging cyber threats and improve security measures.

His presentation on Thursday on vulnerabilities in satellite communications systems used in aerospace and other industries is expected to be one of the most widely watched at the conference. “These devices are wide open.

The goal of this talk is to help change that situation,” Santamarta, 32, told Reuters. The researcher said he discovered the vulnerabilities by “reverse engineering” – or decoding – highly specialized software known as firmware, used to operate communications equipment made by Cobham Plc, Harris Corp, EchoStar Corp’s Hughes Network Systems, Iridium Communications Inc and Japan Radio Co Ltd.

 

In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications, which could interfere with the aircraft’s navigation and safety systems, Santamarta said.

He acknowledged that his hacks have only been tested in controlled environments, such as IOActive’s Madrid laboratory, and they might be difficult to replicate in the real world.

Santamarta said he decided to go public to encourage manufacturers to fix what he saw as risky security flaws. Representatives for Cobham, Harris, Hughes and Iridium said they had reviewed Santamarta’s research and confirmed some of his findings, but downplayed the risks.

For instance, Cobham, whose Aviation 700 aircraft satellite communications equipment was the focus of Santamarta’s research, said it is not possible for hackers to use WiFi signals to interfere with critical systems that rely on satellite communications for navigation and safety.

The hackers must have physical access to Cobham’s equipment, according to Cobham spokesman Greg Caires. “In the aviation and maritime markets we serve, there are strict requirements restricting such access to authorized personnel only,” said Caires. A Japan Radio Co spokesman declined to comment, saying information on such vulnerabilities was not public.

Read the full story here…… 

 


World Bulletin 4th Aug, 2014



[airportcybersecurity.com] ServiceTec is delighted to announce the launch of a new website for its cyber security division, Airport CyberSec. 

AirportCyberSecurity

Airport CyberSec offers airports all over the world a full range of Cyber Security services designed to keep their staff, passengers and data safe.

Airport CyberSec’s cyber security experts work alongside airport IT and security teams to help protect against all aspects of cyber-attack.

Aside from an overview of the services offered by Airport CyberSec, the site will feature expert opinion and insight on the latest developments in the field of cyber security from the team, including Dr. John McCarthy, a world renowned authority on cyber-security strategy, development and Airport CyberSec services include:

Social Engineering Training, to protect against the practice of manipulating people into subverting security procedures or divulging confidential information

CyberIMMUNE, a unique software that mitigates the threat of malware by disabling its ability to write to disk and therefore preventing it from delivering its payload. This unique and powerful tool offers greater protection than any alternative against a zero-day attack – a threat that exploits a previously unknown vulnerability, i.e. one that is so new that the airports IT security team have had no time to address it.

Network & Web-site Security – the integrity of an airport’s network, intranet and website as well as its data security policies will quite obviously have a major influence on that airport’s vulnerability to cyber-attack. Airport CyberSec offers network security audits to test the integrity of an airport’s entire IT infrastructure.

Cyber Security Policies – Airport Cybersec can  offer assistance in the preparation and reviewing of cybersecurity policies based on world-wide best practice.

Monitoring Compliance with CyberSAFE – once best practice cyber-security policies are established staff may know what they should do, however it is also necessary to ensure staff are compliant with the policy on a day to day basis. CyberSAFE assists with both monitoring and enforcement.

 

The website can be found at www.airportcybersecurity.com

 

 


ABOUT SERVICETEC

ServiceTec specialises exclusively in the provision of Managed IT Services to the world’s airport and ,airline industries, and has been doing so since 1989. ServiceTec operates globally, with headquarters in the UK and the USA, and offices in Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and Japan.

Airports served include JFK, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Nashville, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Berlin,

Please visit http://www.servicetec.com


Servicetec Airport Services
Letchworth, UK – 27th March 2014


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[BBC News] China has urged Malaysia to “step up its efforts” in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane that disappeared on Saturday.

BBC Video

Malaysia’s acting transport minister, Hishamuddin Hussein: Search and rescue ‘the main focus’  Photo: BBC News

Nearly three days after the jet went missing, an international effort has still not found the plane’s wreckage.

None of the debris and oil slicks spotted in the water so far have proven to be linked to the disappearance.

Flight MH370 vanished from radar almost three days ago en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur, with 239 people on board.

Relatives of the missing passengers have been told to prepare for the worst.

Search Helicopter

The area being searched by air and sea covers hundreds of kilometres. Photo: BBC News

China said the Malaysian authorities needed to “step up their efforts” to find the missing airliner, which had more than 150 Chinese nationals on board.

“We… have a responsibility to demand and urge the Malaysian side to step up [its] search efforts, start an investigation as soon as possible and provide relevant information to China correctly and in a timely manner,” said Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang.

Patience appears to be wearing thin in the search for the missing airplane, says the BBC’s Celia Hatton in Beijing.

Earlier, the Global Times…….

Read the full story at BBC News


BBC News

10th March, 2014


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[BBC News] An Airbus A380 plane operated by Singapore Airlines was forced to make an emergency landing in Azerbaijan due to loss of cabin pressure.

Oxygen masks were released ahead of the emergency landing

Oxygen masks were released ahead of the emergency landing. Picture: BBC / Amelia Yeh

The plane was flying from London to Singapore and had 467 passengers and 27 crew members on board.

The airline said that oxygen masks were deployed and the aircraft landed “uneventfully” at the Baku airport.

It said that none of the passengers or crew was injured and that it was investigating what caused the problem.

“We are seeking clearance from local authorities to transfer affected customers to a hotel until a replacement aircraft arrives from Singapore,” a spokesman for the airline said in a statement.

In response to passenger reports that it was because of a faulty door, a Singapore Airlines spokesman said that “on the earlier flight into London there was a noise reported from one of the main deck doors”.

But he added that “the door was inspected by engineers on the ground in London with no findings, and the aircraft was cleared for continued operation”.

Read the full story at BBC News…..


BBC News
6th Jan, 2014



[BBC News] A Boeing 777 aircraft has crash-landed at San Francisco international airport, killing at least person and injuring as many as 30, diplomats say.

The plane reportedly landed and then crashed on San Francisco International Airport's Runway 28L

The plane reportedly landed and then crashed on San Francisco International Airport‘s Runway 28L

Pictures posted on Twitter showed passengers jumping down the inflatable emergency slides and leaving the area, as plumes of smoke rise from the plane.

Firefighters and rescue teams are at the scene of the downed Asiana Airlines Flight 214, which had taken off from South Korea’s capital, Seoul.

The cause of the crash is unclear.

Early indications suggest the plane came in too short and hit the seawall at the airport.

There were 291 passengers and 16 crew on board, Asiana said.

While the sequence of events remains unclear, it appeared the plane landed and then crashed on San Francisco International Airport’s Runway 28L, said Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown.

Footage of the scene showed debris strewn on the runway and smoke pouring from the jet, as fire crews sprayed a white fire retardant into gaping holes in the craft’s roof.

One engine and the tail fin appeared to have broken away from the main wreckage.

Passenger David Eun tweeted a picture of people jumping out of the plane’s emergency inflatable slides and wrote: “I just crash landed at SFO. Tail ripped off. Most everyone seems fine. I’m ok. Surreal…”

Mr Eun, who describes himself as a “digital media guy” and “frequent flier”, added: “Fire and rescue people all over the place. They’re evacuating the injured. Haven’t felt this way since 9/11.”

A witness to the crash, Ki Siadatan, said the plane “looked out of control” as it descended over San Francisco Bay to land just before 11:30 (18:30 GMT).

“We heard a ‘boom’ and saw the plane disappear into a cloud of dust and smoke,” he told the BBC. “There was then a second explosion.”

He saw events unfold from the balcony of his home in the Millbrae area of San Francisco, which overlooks the airport.

Weather conditions were fine and there was little wind, he added.

Arrivals and departures at the airport have been suspended since the incident……

Read the full story at BBC News…..


BBC News
6th July, 2013



[Dawn.com] Singapore Airlines announced on Thursday that it intends to spend more than Sg$20 million ($16 million) to upgrade its airport lounges worldwide in a bid to stay ahead of the competition.

“We hope to replicate that ‘home away from home’ experience in our lounges", SIA senior vice president for products and services Tan Pee Teck.  Photo: Wikipedia

“We hope to replicate that ‘home away from home’ experience in our lounges”, SIA senior vice president for products and services Tan Pee Teck. Photo: Wikipedia

The announcement of the upgrade came nine days after the airline, facing fiercer rivalry from Asian and Middle Eastern carriers, unveiled plans to introduce revamped seats and cabin interiors as well as improved in-flight entertainment.

The upgrade of its “SilverKris” lounges will be carried out over five years starting from the middle of next year when the facility at Sydney airport will be fitted with a new design concept, SIA said in a statement.

“We hope to replicate that ‘home away from home’ experience in our lounges, along with the warm Asian hospitality that Singapore Airlines is renowned for,”SIA senior vice president for products and services Tan Pee Teck said.

The airline has 15 SilverKris lounges at airports worldwide, including one in New Delhi – to be officially opened next month – and in Seoul which is scheduled for completion by the end of the year.

SIA is regarded as a trendsetter in aviation and is famous for its cabin service, but rivals like Cathay Pacific in Asia and Etihad, Emirates and Gulf Air from the Middle East have been closing the gap while offering lower fares.

It said last week it had hired BMW Group subsidiary DesignworksUSA and James Park Associates, two renowned design companies, to develop the “next generation of inflight cabin products” expected to be introduced next year.

The changes will include revamped seats, redesigned cabins and upgraded entertainment platforms as new passenger planes from Boeing and Airbus begin arriving.

Read the original story at Dawn.com…..


Dawn.com
25th Aug, 2012



[Gulf Daily News] DUBAI: Abu Dhabi‘s rapidly-growing Etihad Airways has bought a four per cent stake in Virgin Australia, its fourth overseas deal since December as the airline tries to compete with Gulf rivals.

Etihad said it had acquired the 3.96pc Virgin Australia stake for $35.6 million via market purchases over the past few weeks. Photo: Wikipedia

Etihad said it had acquired the 3.96pc Virgin Australia stake for $35.6 million via market purchases over the past few weeks. Photo: Wikipedia

The airline, founded eight-years ago, has already bought stakes in three other carriers in a push to chase the big Gulf state-backed airlines like Dubai’s Emirates and Qatar Airways.

Etihad said it had acquired the 3.96pc Virgin Australia stake for $35.6 million via market purchases over the past few weeks.

“At a point in time, we would like to take it (stake) to a minimum of 10pc, if we get the necessary approvals,” Etihad chief executive James Hogan.

“This is a long game. There’s no race here. We have a 10-year commercial relationship with Virgin Australia. This is just step by step building.”

The Virgin stake shows Etihad’s willingness to make acquisitions to compete with its larger Gulf rivals, which are increasingly challenging European, Asian and Australian carriers on long-haul routes.

Hogan said that the growth strategy is designed to make it the Gulf’s top carrier. He said the airline would take delivery of 100 aircraft over the next eight years but still would not be the biggest airline in the Gulf.

“We believe that by investing and partnering it enables us to extend our network,” he said.

In December, the unlisted airline raised a stake in Air Berlin to nearly 30pc from just under 3pc, for about 73m euros. Last month, it bought a 3pc stake in Irish airline Aer Lingus as a precursor to a commercial tie-up that could…….

Read the rest of this story at Gulf Daily News…..


Gulf Daily News
Wednesday, June 06, 2012