Archive for the ‘Australia & New Zealand’ Category


[Stuff.co.nz] Despite increased security travel measures around the world, one woman managed to board the wrong plane, with the wrong airline – all under the wrong name.

Despite the fact that she was travelling under a different name, on passenger was able to board a Cathay Pacific plane.

According to The South China Morning Post, the incident happened at Taiwan Airport when a woman, known as “Ms Hong” was flying to Hong Kong.

The first error in the series of incredible events happened when she checked into the Cathay Pacific desk – instead of Hong Kong Airlines.

Despite checking in with the wrong carrier, Hong was processed. She was also holding a boarding pass that belonged to a man with the same surname, also flying to Hong Kong.

The flights had been booked by Hong’s boyfriend who was told his partner had not boarded her Hong Kong Airlines flight.

SCMP reports that the woman was furious.

“The name on the air ticket wasn’t me. Even the sex on the air ticket was not right. This is ridiculous,” she said.

Cathay Pacific and Hong Kong Airlines have since come together to ensure Hong made a safe return trip, she was also given the use of Cathay’s executive lounge.

A spokesperson for Cathay Pacific confirmed there had been an ……

Read the full story at Stuff.co.nz….


Stuff.co.nz
27th February, 2016


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[NBCCHICARGO.COM] A cyber security expert tells NBC5 Investigates he has found a way to hack into the satellite communications systems used in multiple industries.

“These devices are wide open right now,” said Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant based in Madrid, Spain with IOActive.

"For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels," said Santamarta

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. Image: nbcchicargo.com

Pilots, ship captains and military personnel rely on satellite networks to communicate when there are no phone lines or wireless networks available.

“If someone can see the password or that user name it’s over,” he added. “Those vulnerabilities can be exploited to remotely compromise those devices.

Santamarta said he used something called reverse engineering — or decoding — to hack satellite communications equipment used in aerospace, maritime and military industries.

“In the military sector they use satellite terminals for combat units,” said Santamarta. “They normally encrypt the radio [transmissions] they send. But we can disrupt the satellite communications channel so we can prevent combat units [from asking] for help if they are being attacked.”

And in the maritime sector, satellite communications are used to send and receive vital information that affects the safety of the crew.

“If they are being attacked by terrorists, or they are suffering fire, they can send a distress call,” he said. “But we found we can modify the firmware in some of those terminals, so we can prevent a crew from sending a distress call.”

Santamarta recently published a 25-page report and went public with his findings at Defcon 22 – the largest hacking conference in the world – held earlier this month in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. “In some cases you need physical access to compromise the devices we analyzed, but in other cases you can use Wi-Fi or the entertainment network to access that device.”

His research took place in a lab setting and has not been tested on an actual commercial plane. But his findings have raised concerns in the aviation industry.

Read the full story at NBCCHICARGO.OM here….

 


NBCCHICARGO.COM
21st August, 2014


 

 

 


[World Bulletin] Cybersecurity researcher Ruben Santamarta says he has figured out how to hack the satellite communications equipment on passenger jets through their WiFi and in-flight entertainment systems – a claim that, if confirmed, could prompt a review of aircraft security.

“In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications”

Santamarta, a consultant with cybersecurity firm IOActive, is scheduled to lay out the technical details of his research at this week’s Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas, an annual convention where thousands of hackers and security experts meet to discuss emerging cyber threats and improve security measures.

His presentation on Thursday on vulnerabilities in satellite communications systems used in aerospace and other industries is expected to be one of the most widely watched at the conference. “These devices are wide open.

The goal of this talk is to help change that situation,” Santamarta, 32, told Reuters. The researcher said he discovered the vulnerabilities by “reverse engineering” – or decoding – highly specialized software known as firmware, used to operate communications equipment made by Cobham Plc, Harris Corp, EchoStar Corp’s Hughes Network Systems, Iridium Communications Inc and Japan Radio Co Ltd.

 

In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications, which could interfere with the aircraft’s navigation and safety systems, Santamarta said.

He acknowledged that his hacks have only been tested in controlled environments, such as IOActive’s Madrid laboratory, and they might be difficult to replicate in the real world.

Santamarta said he decided to go public to encourage manufacturers to fix what he saw as risky security flaws. Representatives for Cobham, Harris, Hughes and Iridium said they had reviewed Santamarta’s research and confirmed some of his findings, but downplayed the risks.

For instance, Cobham, whose Aviation 700 aircraft satellite communications equipment was the focus of Santamarta’s research, said it is not possible for hackers to use WiFi signals to interfere with critical systems that rely on satellite communications for navigation and safety.

The hackers must have physical access to Cobham’s equipment, according to Cobham spokesman Greg Caires. “In the aviation and maritime markets we serve, there are strict requirements restricting such access to authorized personnel only,” said Caires. A Japan Radio Co spokesman declined to comment, saying information on such vulnerabilities was not public.

Read the full story here…… 

 


World Bulletin 4th Aug, 2014



[airportcybersecurity.com] ServiceTec is delighted to announce the launch of a new website for its cyber security division, Airport CyberSec. 

AirportCyberSecurity

Airport CyberSec offers airports all over the world a full range of Cyber Security services designed to keep their staff, passengers and data safe.

Airport CyberSec’s cyber security experts work alongside airport IT and security teams to help protect against all aspects of cyber-attack.

Aside from an overview of the services offered by Airport CyberSec, the site will feature expert opinion and insight on the latest developments in the field of cyber security from the team, including Dr. John McCarthy, a world renowned authority on cyber-security strategy, development and Airport CyberSec services include:

Social Engineering Training, to protect against the practice of manipulating people into subverting security procedures or divulging confidential information

CyberIMMUNE, a unique software that mitigates the threat of malware by disabling its ability to write to disk and therefore preventing it from delivering its payload. This unique and powerful tool offers greater protection than any alternative against a zero-day attack – a threat that exploits a previously unknown vulnerability, i.e. one that is so new that the airports IT security team have had no time to address it.

Network & Web-site Security – the integrity of an airport’s network, intranet and website as well as its data security policies will quite obviously have a major influence on that airport’s vulnerability to cyber-attack. Airport CyberSec offers network security audits to test the integrity of an airport’s entire IT infrastructure.

Cyber Security Policies – Airport Cybersec can  offer assistance in the preparation and reviewing of cybersecurity policies based on world-wide best practice.

Monitoring Compliance with CyberSAFE – once best practice cyber-security policies are established staff may know what they should do, however it is also necessary to ensure staff are compliant with the policy on a day to day basis. CyberSAFE assists with both monitoring and enforcement.

 

The website can be found at www.airportcybersecurity.com

 

 


ABOUT SERVICETEC

ServiceTec specialises exclusively in the provision of Managed IT Services to the world’s airport and ,airline industries, and has been doing so since 1989. ServiceTec operates globally, with headquarters in the UK and the USA, and offices in Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and Japan.

Airports served include JFK, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Nashville, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Berlin,

Please visit http://www.servicetec.com


Servicetec Airport Services
Letchworth, UK – 27th March 2014


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[Airport Informer] Struggling Australian carrier Qantas on Tuesday said it was committed to slashing costs by Aus$2 billion (US$1.8 billion) but refused to confirm or deny a report that it will axe 5,000 jobs.

A Qanta Boeing 747 on final approach to Heathrow Airport. photo: Courtesy Wikipedia

he airline has been battling record fuel costs and fierce competition from subsidized rivals and in December said 1,000 jobs would go while warning it faced a half-year loss of up to Aus$300 million.

Its interim result is due on Thursday and the Sydney Daily Telegraph, citing a Qantas source, said the job losses would be much worse as the airline restructures its finances to convince the government it deserves a debt guarantee.

As well as sacking 5,000 staff, the newspaper said Qantas may sell some of its terminals, while The Australian reported it would accelerate the retirement of older planes and defer new orders.

The airline refused to go into details.

Read the full story at Business Insider Australia here….


Business insider
24th Feb, 2014


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[Daily Mail] We may have all experienced turbulence on flights, but when a rough patch is so bad that the ceiling ends up covered in coffee then you know it’s serious.

Meals ended up in aisles and coffee on the ceiling after plane lost altitude. Picture Daily Mail / Alan Cross

Meals ended up in aisles & coffee on the ceiling after plane lost altitude. Picture Daily Mail / Alan Cross

Passengers on a recent Singapore Airlines flight were left surrounded by a chaotic mess after their flight fell 20 metres when it hit severe turbulence. A total of 11 passengers and one crew member were injured on flight SQ308 from Singapore to London last Sunday.

Flight attendants were told to immediately take their seats just before the aircraft hit the turbulence

Flight attendants were told to immediately take their seats just before the aircraft hit the turbulence. Picture: Daily Mail / Alan Cross

One passenger on the flight, who saw his coffee end up on the ceiling, managed to take pictures of the destruction which he posted to Instagram.

Alan Cross told ABC News that passengers had been warned to expect turbulence and that the breakfast service would be temporarily suspended.

A short while after the seat belt sign came on, the captain issued an abrupt order for all flight attendants to take their seats immediately.

Coffee can be seen on the ceiling of the Singapore to Heathrow flight following the turbulence.

Coffee can be seen on the ceiling of the Singapore to Heathrow flight following the turbulence. Picture Daily Mail / Alan Cross

Mr Cross said the subsequent turbulence felt ‘like being in an elevator with a cut cable or free-falling from some amusement park ride.’

He said everything that was not tied down, including people, hit the ceiling.

The airline told The Australian: ‘Eleven passengers and one crew member sustained minor injuries when the aircraft experienced a sudden loss of altitude and were attended to by medical personnel on arrival at Heathrow Airport.

Seat-belt signs were on at the time and meal services had already been suspended.’ ……

Read the whole story with more pictures and video at The Mail Online …..


The Mail Online
4th June, 2013