Archive for the ‘Aviation & Airports (General News)’ Category


[Airport Informer] There are no words that we can add to report on this outrage today, other than to say that our thoughts remain with all of those directly and indirectly affected this morning. 

Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy

    Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy.

 


Airport Informer
22nd March, 2016


 


[The Telegraph] A Syrian refugee has been stuck in a Turkish airport for a year, forced to live in the “Problematic Passengers Room” and constantly facing the threat of being deported to Syria, according to Amnesty.

1 year is enough says Fadi Mansour

1 year is enough says Fadi Mansour

Fadi Mansour has been arbitrarily detained in inhumane conditions at Istanbul Ataturk Airport since March 15, 2015, Amnesty International claimed as it urged Ankara to release him.

Mr Mansour apparently told relatives he is considering asking to be return to Syria because “at least there I die once and it’s over, instead of dying more and more each day I spend in here”.

His lawyer has urged the courts to release him from detention, where Amnesty says he has no natural light and artificial lighting is constantly on.

During his year in the airport, he was attacked by another detainee and asked to return to Lebanon. After arriving there, the Lebanese authorities denied him entry and he came back to Turkey where authorities re-detained him, Amnesty said.

Turkish Airlines aircrafts taxi at Ataturk International Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, where a Syrian refugee has been stuck for a year Photo: REUTERS

Turkish Airlines aircraft taxi at Ataturk International Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, where a Syrian refugee has been stuck for a year Photo: REUTERS

But after being kidnapped and held for ransom by a gang, he left for Turkey in 2014.

A month later, he left for Malaysia which would not allow admission because of the alleged use of false identity papers, Amnesty said.

In what appears to be Mr Mansour’s Twitter account, he has urged the authorities to let him leave, in one picture he wrote: “One year is enough.”

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..

 


By Raziye Akkoc
8:01PM 15 March, 2016



[Telegraph] London hubs experienced the most flight delays among airports in Britain between July and September last year, with nearly a third of passengers (31 per cent) delayed at the capital’s five airports last summer, new figures from the Civil Aviation Authority reveal.

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

Gatwick was the worst, with 43 per cent of its summer flights departing at least 15 minutes behind schedule, followed by Luton and Heathrow, ranked second and fourth worst overall, respectively.

Stansted and London City Airport fared best among London airports, finishing in 10th and 19th place, while Jersey and Manchester rounded out the top five UK airports with the most delays in the third quarter of last year.

Britain’s airports had its busiest summer ever, with more than 78 million passengers passing through one during the three summer months. The result was the worst flight punctuality of any summer period since 2010.

On-time flight performance dropped three per cent to 73 per cent, while the average delay time per flight across the 24 airports surveyed was 15 minutes, a one-minute increase on the same period in 2014.

“Airlines are accommodating the continuing strong passenger demand by carrying the extra passengers on larger aircraft, rather than increasing the number of flights significantly,” said Tim Johnson, CAA Policy Director.

“The strong passenger demand and a……

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..

 


The Telegraph
9th March, 2016


 


[Daily Mail] The first ever Boeing 727, first revealed to the public in 1962, is set to fly again after sitting in a museum for the last 25 years.

A team of volunteers with a keen interest in aviation, and the skills to make a difference, have spent weeks restoring the United Airlines jetliner to its former glory.

A tentative date of March 1 has been pencilled in when the aircraft will rise from the tarmac once more

A tentative date of March 1 has been penciled in when the aircraft will rise from the tarmac once more

The plane was donated by United Airlines back in 1991 to the Museum of Flight’s Restoration Center at Paine Field, where it has been sat ever since.

The restoration of the iconic jet has been documented by aviation enthusiast and keen photographer Robert Bogash on his blog.

‘We are waking up an airplane that first flew 53 years ago, and that has been “sleeping” for the past 25 years,’ writes Mr Bogash.

‘But – especially for me – I began my affair with her 32 years ago – she is still an airplane that has the magic of flight embedded in her genes, and we intend to let her experience that magic one more time. And we will savour the…….

Read the full story at the MailOnline…..

 


MailOnline
Friday 26th February, 2016>



[The Guardian] Price comparison study finds the likes of Ryanair and easyJet charging more than triple the supermarket price for popular food and drink brands.

 Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy

Low cost airlines are hiking up the price of snacks and drinks by more than 1,000% compared with everyday prices, according to research that shows that a 12p cup-a-soup sachet can cost passengers as much as £2.50.

A comparison of six major budget airlines serving the UK market found huge price increases on basic refreshments, with most carriers charging £2.60 for a tea and £1.80 for a 500ml bottle of water.

Ryanair, perceived by most as the airline offering the lowest seat prices, was found to be the most expensive when it came to on-board snacks, charging £2.34 for a bottle of water and £1.56 for a chocolate bar.

Passengers on a Ryanair flight could find themselves paying £1.96 for a 200ml can of cola, and £2.34 for a 160g bag of gummy sweets.

However, Ryanair is by no means alone in……

Read more at the The Guardian……….

 


The Guardian
Friday 126th February, 2016



[Stuff.co.nz] Despite increased security travel measures around the world, one woman managed to board the wrong plane, with the wrong airline – all under the wrong name.

Despite the fact that she was travelling under a different name, on passenger was able to board a Cathay Pacific plane.

According to The South China Morning Post, the incident happened at Taiwan Airport when a woman, known as “Ms Hong” was flying to Hong Kong.

The first error in the series of incredible events happened when she checked into the Cathay Pacific desk – instead of Hong Kong Airlines.

Despite checking in with the wrong carrier, Hong was processed. She was also holding a boarding pass that belonged to a man with the same surname, also flying to Hong Kong.

The flights had been booked by Hong’s boyfriend who was told his partner had not boarded her Hong Kong Airlines flight.

SCMP reports that the woman was furious.

“The name on the air ticket wasn’t me. Even the sex on the air ticket was not right. This is ridiculous,” she said.

Cathay Pacific and Hong Kong Airlines have since come together to ensure Hong made a safe return trip, she was also given the use of Cathay’s executive lounge.

A spokesperson for Cathay Pacific confirmed there had been an ……

Read the full story at Stuff.co.nz….


Stuff.co.nz
27th February, 2016



[Toronto Sun] The airport in Bathurst, N.B., has reopened and flights have resumed after a hazmat team cleared a package containing what was described as potentially radioactive material.

Air Canada aircraft are seen at Toronto Pearson International Airport, in this September 20, 2011 file photo. . REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files Air Canada aircraft are seen at Toronto Pearson International Airport, in this September 20, 2011 file photo. . REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files

 

A spokeswoman with the Bathurst Regional Airport said crew discovered the package was dented while being unloaded from an Air Canada flight Sunday at around 4 p.m.

Katherine Lanteigne says the airport went into lockdown and one departing flight was delayed, but it reopened about four hours later and after a police hazmat team determined the package was not ruptured.

Main story here…..

 


Toronto Sun
Sunday 21st February, 2016



[BBC News] Passengers are facing widespread flight disruption after a computer failure at the UK’s air traffic control centre.

Vicky Lane, a passenger on a grounded London to Dublin plane at Gatwick said: “We’ve been stuck on a Ryanair flight… for over an hour.

“The doors are open and we’re really cold. I’m not sure when we will be leaving.”

Another passenger, on a flight to Paris, said his plane had “circled around the Lake District for half an hour before turning back to Edinburgh”.

Ed Bott told the BBC he was: “Currently sitting on the tarmac. None the wiser. Waiting for news as to what’s happening.”

Aviation journalist David Learmount said the IT problem would cause “major disruption” but would be resolved by Saturday.

“This impacts not just people within the UK, it impacts flights heading here from anywhere – anything heading this way will be told some of them can’t be accepted, and they will have to go back to where they flew from or consider diverting to other countries,” he told the BBC.

The RAF – which has its own air traffic control systems – said the UK military was unaffected.

According to one travel expert, the compensation bill from the disruption could run into tens of millions.

“The airlines will already be racking up the costs,” Independent journalist Simon Calder told BBC News. “Simply refunding passengers’ fares is going to cost them hundreds of thousands of pounds.

“The airline also has an unlimited duty of care to put people up in hotels, to feed them and everything else, until they can get them to their destination.”

Read the full story here at BBC News….

 


BBC News
12th Dec, 2014

 


 

 

 

Grey line

[BBC News] An unidentified drone came close to hitting a plane as it landed at Heathrow, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has confirmed.

An Airbus A320 pilot reported seeing a helicopter-style drone as the jet was 700 feet off the ground on its approach to the runway at 1416 GMT on 22 July.

The CAA has not identified the airline or how close the drone came to the plane, which can carry 180 people.

It gave the incident an “A” rating, meaning a “serious risk of collision”.

This is the highest incident rating the CAA can give.

Investigators were unable to identify the drone, which did not appear on air traffic control radar and disappeared after the encounter.

In May the pilot of an ATR 72 turbo-prop plane reported seeing a helicopter drone only 80 feet away as he approached Southend airport at a height of 1,500 feet.

The incidents have prompted a warning from the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) that the rapid increase in the number of drones operated by amateur enthusiasts now poses “a real risk” to commercial aircraft.

The association’s general secretary, Jim McAuslan said drones could cause a repeat of the “Hudson River experience”, when a plane was forced to land in water in New York in 2009 after birds were sucked into its engines.

“The risk of a 10 kilogram object hitting a plane is a real one that pilots are very concerned about” he said.

“A small drone could be a risky distraction for a pilot coming into land and cause serious damage if they hit one.”

Sales of drones have increased rapidly, with UK sales running at a rate of between 1,000 and 2,000 every month.

They are expected to be very popular as Christmas presents.

They cost as little as £35 for a smaller model – more advanced drones capable of carrying a high definition camera and travelling at 45 miles per hour cost almost £3,000.

Only a very small minority of people operating drones have attended training courses in how to fly them.

A spokesman for the CAA said it had to depend on people using their common sense when they operated drones.

He said the current level of risk should be “kept in perspective” but warned that breaking laws governing the use of drones could potentially threaten commercial aircraft.

“People using unmanned aircraft need to think, use common sense and take responsibility for them”, he said.

“There are rules which have the force of law and have to be followed.”

Drones may not be flown higher than 400 feet or further than 500 metres from the operator, and they must not go within 50 metres of people, vehicles or buildings.

There are exclusion zones around airports and the approaches to them for drones weighing more than seven kilograms.

Mr McAuslan said there was an urgent need for rules to be tightened before much larger unmanned cargo planes – potentially the size of a Boeing 737 – took to the skies.

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC News
7th December, 2014



[NBCCHICARGO.COM] A cyber security expert tells NBC5 Investigates he has found a way to hack into the satellite communications systems used in multiple industries.

“These devices are wide open right now,” said Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant based in Madrid, Spain with IOActive.

"For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels," said Santamarta

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. Image: nbcchicargo.com

Pilots, ship captains and military personnel rely on satellite networks to communicate when there are no phone lines or wireless networks available.

“If someone can see the password or that user name it’s over,” he added. “Those vulnerabilities can be exploited to remotely compromise those devices.

Santamarta said he used something called reverse engineering — or decoding — to hack satellite communications equipment used in aerospace, maritime and military industries.

“In the military sector they use satellite terminals for combat units,” said Santamarta. “They normally encrypt the radio [transmissions] they send. But we can disrupt the satellite communications channel so we can prevent combat units [from asking] for help if they are being attacked.”

And in the maritime sector, satellite communications are used to send and receive vital information that affects the safety of the crew.

“If they are being attacked by terrorists, or they are suffering fire, they can send a distress call,” he said. “But we found we can modify the firmware in some of those terminals, so we can prevent a crew from sending a distress call.”

Santamarta recently published a 25-page report and went public with his findings at Defcon 22 – the largest hacking conference in the world – held earlier this month in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. “In some cases you need physical access to compromise the devices we analyzed, but in other cases you can use Wi-Fi or the entertainment network to access that device.”

His research took place in a lab setting and has not been tested on an actual commercial plane. But his findings have raised concerns in the aviation industry.

Read the full story at NBCCHICARGO.OM here….

 


NBCCHICARGO.COM
21st August, 2014