Archive for the ‘Edinburgh Airport’ Category


[BBC News] Passengers are facing widespread flight disruption after a computer failure at the UK’s air traffic control centre.

Vicky Lane, a passenger on a grounded London to Dublin plane at Gatwick said: “We’ve been stuck on a Ryanair flight… for over an hour.

“The doors are open and we’re really cold. I’m not sure when we will be leaving.”

Another passenger, on a flight to Paris, said his plane had “circled around the Lake District for half an hour before turning back to Edinburgh”.

Ed Bott told the BBC he was: “Currently sitting on the tarmac. None the wiser. Waiting for news as to what’s happening.”

Aviation journalist David Learmount said the IT problem would cause “major disruption” but would be resolved by Saturday.

“This impacts not just people within the UK, it impacts flights heading here from anywhere – anything heading this way will be told some of them can’t be accepted, and they will have to go back to where they flew from or consider diverting to other countries,” he told the BBC.

The RAF – which has its own air traffic control systems – said the UK military was unaffected.

According to one travel expert, the compensation bill from the disruption could run into tens of millions.

“The airlines will already be racking up the costs,” Independent journalist Simon Calder told BBC News. “Simply refunding passengers’ fares is going to cost them hundreds of thousands of pounds.

“The airline also has an unlimited duty of care to put people up in hotels, to feed them and everything else, until they can get them to their destination.”

Read the full story here at BBC News….

 


BBC News
12th Dec, 2014

 


 

 

 

Grey line
Advertisements

[International Airport Review] Heathrow Airport Holdings (HAH) is reported to be planning to sell off Southampton, Glasgow and Aberdeen Airports by the end of the year.

The sale would mean that HAH, formerly British Airports Authority (BAA), would be left with just London Heathrow Airport. Photo: Wikipedia

The sale would mean that HAH, formerly British Airports Authority (BAA), would be left with just London Heathrow Airport. Reports claim that the sale would be in order to fund further development projects at the world’s third busiest airport.

A statement from HAH read: “Over recent months Heathrow Airport Holdings group shareholders and management have been considering their strategic position in relation to our three airports, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Southampton.

“As a result the group is now formally entering a sale process. While there is currently no certainty that a sale will be concluded, the group intends to work towards completing a transaction by the end of the year.”

In addition to London Heathrow, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Southampton, BAA once also owned Gatwick, Stansted and Edinburgh Airports as well, but following a performance inquiry by the Competition Commission (now the Competition and Markets Authority), BAA were ruled to sell Gatwick, Stansted and either Glasgow or Edinburgh Airports in order to break up the monopoly.

Following the ruling, Global Infrastructure Partners purchased Gatwick Airport in 2009 and Edinburgh in 2012, and Stansted was purchased by Manchester Airport Group in 2013.

 

Read the original story at International Airport Review…..

 


International Airport Review
7th August, 2014
 


 


[BBTN] Airports have warned of potential delays through immigration control on Wednesday (March 20) due to a strike by Border Force staff.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS. Photo: Wikipedia

Employees, who are members of the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union, are due to go on a 24-hour strike designed to coincide with tomorrow’s budget from chancellor George Osborne.

UK Border Agency said in a statement: “Our top priority is minimising disruption to our public-facing services and our public offices will remain open for business. We apologise for any disruption to services which result from this industrial action.”

Heathrow warned that arriving passengers “may experience some delays at immigration” but said it was not changing any flight schedules.

“The Home Office has assured us it has contingency plans in place to minimise any disruption caused by the strike,” said the airport. “We are operating a normal flight schedule and we are not advising passengers to change their plans.”

PCS workers around the UK are taking industrial action in protest at proposed cuts to pay, pensions and working conditions. The union said the timing of the strike was designed “to put maximum pressure on ministers who are refusing to talk to us”.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS. “When the chancellor stands up to deliver his budget we’ll be protesting across the UK.”

Stansted said its flights would be operating as normal but added they may be some delays at passport control.

UK Border Force has contingency plans in place and we will work with them to ensure any disruption to our passengers is kept to a minimum,” said the airport.

It was a similar message from Luton which advised incoming passengers to take a series of steps to ease any potential delays including the use of automatic e-Passport gates, having landing cards fully completed and staying in family groups.

For the latest updates on the strike from UKBA, CLICK HERE…..

Read the original story at Buying Business travel…..


Buying Business Travel
19th Mar, 2013



[BBC NewsVirgin Atlantic has unveiled details of its UK domestic service, including that the operation is called Little Red.

Sir Richard promised that Little Red will have a

Sir Richard promised that Little Red will have a “rock and roll spirit” Photo: Wikipedia

t will launch on 31 March in Manchester, 5 April in Edinburgh and 9 April in Aberdeen, providing a total of 26 daily services to Heathrow airport.

Virgin won key take-off and landing slots at Heathrow after the struggling carrier Bmi was taken over by British Airways’ parent company IAG.

Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson said Little Red will go head-on with BA.

BA operates around 52 daily flights between Heathrow and Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow. BA also runs services to Scotland from Gatwick and London City airports.

Virgin Atlantic hopes that Little Red, which will use Heathrow Terminal 1, will help feed traffic onto its international service operating from Terminal 3.

Sir Richard said on Friday that Little Red will “go head-to-head with BA to provide domestic flights that deliver Virgin Atlantic’s rock and roll spirit as well as real value for money.”

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC News
1st Mar, 2013



[Reuters] British travel group Thomas Cook plans to merge its German, British and Belgian airline operations, appointing a new airline management board to run the business.

Condor, Thomas Cook Airlines UK and Thomas Cook Airlines Belgium will become one airline segment within the group from 1st  March.

Condor, Thomas Cook Airlines UK and Thomas Cook Airlines Belgium will become one airline segment within the group from 1st March. Photo: Wikipedia

The world’s oldest travel group said on Tuesday that Condor, its German airline brand, Thomas Cook Airlines UK and Thomas Cook Airlines Belgium would become one airline segment within the group from March 1.

The move is part of a turnaround plan, the effects of which began to kick-in late last year. The company, which was thrown a lifeline by lenders last May, has seen a steady improvement in its finances and a pick-up in demand in recent months.

The new airline management board will be chaired jointly by Christoph Debus, group head of air travel, and Ralf Teckentrup, Condor’s chief executive, the company said. Former easyJet and KLM executive Cor Vrieswijk will take the reins as chief operating officer of Thomas Cook Airlines UK next month.

“At time when the European airline industry is experiencing major change, we believe that our airline will be stronger as one integrated business,” said Debus.

Frank Pullman will retire as managing director of Thomas Cook Airlines UK next month, the company said…..

Read the full story at Reuters…..


Reuters
5th Feb, 2013



[The Scotsman] LOSS-MAKING airline Flybe is to shed 300 – one in ten of its staff – as part of a “turnaround plan” announced today in an attempt to return to profit.

Flybe are to cut 300 jobs in a bid to return to profit.

Flybe are to cut 300 jobs in a bid to return to profit. Photo: Wikipeda

The carrier, which describes itself as Europe’s largest regional airline, said it hoped the £35 million cuts plan would return it to the black in 2013-14.

The job losses will include one in five management posts, to create a “leaner, more focused business.

Flybe said it did not “currently envisage any significant changes to the number of UK bases or its route network at this stage” but they would be reviewed.

The first part of the two-part plan could also involve some activities being subcontracted to other companies.

The moves come as Berwickshire-born chief executive Jim French prepares to move to become chairman.

Read the original story at The Scotsman…..

 


Reporting by: ALASTAIR DALTON
23rd Jan, 2013>



[Flightglobal] Virgin Atlantic Airways has fleshed out further details of its upcoming entry into the UK domestic market, confirming plans to operate “multiple daily flights” from London Heathrow airport to two Scottish cities.

Virgin will add new Heathrow services to Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

Virgin will add new Heathrow services to Edinburgh and Aberdeen. Photo: Wikipedia

The airline had previously announced that flights from Manchester to Heathrow will begin on 31 March 2013, becoming its first domestic feeder service.

In the “second stage” of its domestic expansion, Virgin will add new Heathrow services to Edinburgh and Aberdeen. International Airlines Group (IAG), the parent company of rival British Airways, currently has a monopoly on both routes following its acquisition of BMI.

“At least 1.8 million Scottish passengers, equivalent to a third of the population, have been left without a choice on these routes since IAG’s takeover of BMI,” says outgoing Virgin chief executive Steve Ridgway, who will leave the company next spring.

“As a monopoly operator, BA has the opportunity, the incentive and the means to increase fares and reduce the number of flights available.”

BA is reducing Heathrow-Aberdeen flights by almost one-third and Heathrow-Edinburgh flights by one-quarter when compared with the number of combined services previously operated by the flag carrier and its one-time rival BMI, Virgin claims.

Ridgway had earlier acknowledged that Scottish routes will likely form the backbone of its upcoming domestic operations – to be served by leased Airbus A319s.

IAG has been forced to relinquish 14 slot pairs at Heathrow in order to trim its market share at the hub following the BMI acquisition. Competition RX, the company monitoring the slot auction, says at least seven of those slots must be used for Edinburgh or Aberdeen flights.

Virgin is bidding for 12 of the slots, with the remaining two earmarked for Transaero’s Moscow route. Tickets for Manchester went on sale last month and Virgin says the route will be operated irrespective of how many slots it ultimately secures.

However, no such assurance has been given for flights to Edinburgh, Aberdeen or Moscow – also tentatively announced by Virgin – and with tickets yet to go on sale it appears that all three routes are predicated on its success in the slot auction.

Read the original story at Flightglobal……

 


Story by Martin Rivers
14th Sept, 2012



[Metro] A recent poll from travel search site Skyscanner claims Luton was rated as the most unfriendly airport with only 5.76 points out of ten.

Luton has been named the UK's most unfriendly airport in a new survey.

Luton has been named the UK’s most unfriendly airport in a new survey. Photo: Wikipedia

London airports Stansted, Heathrow and Gatwick also featured towards the bottom of the list.

Meanwhile, the one airport which is getting things right is Edinburgh, earning a massive thumbs up from visitors.

ith a score of 7.41 points out of ten for friendliness it was followed closely by Newcastle (7.34) and then Manchester (6.87). Around Europe, Paris was voted the rudest airport with a score of just 4.86 points, while Moscow received 5.03 points and Istanbul was awarded 5.91 points.

The friendliest European airport, according to travellers, was shown to be Copenhagen (7.08 points).

Commenting on the results, Victoria Bailie from Skyscanner said: ‘We like to have a good moan and grumble but overall, the average scores were positives for the UK’s airports.

‘Despite the summer rush, they’ve clearly been doing a good job to help kick start our holiday on a positive note.’

Read the original story at Metro…..

 


Metro.co.uk
21st Aug, 2012



[BBC News] A consultation on expanding airports in south-east England has been delayed again amid reports of tensions within the coalition over the issue.

Waiting: Planes queue for take off at London City Airport - congestion could eventually send air fares skywards

Waiting: Planes queue for take off at London City Airport – congestion could increase air fares.

The consultation had been due to be announced later but is now unlikely to go ahead until the autumn.

The Lib Dems are opposed to expansion, and the coalition agreement rules out new airports in the region. But there is speculation that Chancellor George Osborne is warming to the idea of a third Heathrow runway.

Several Tory MPs are also openly supporting the plan, says BBC transport correspondent Richard Westcott. They have been accused of trying to delay everything until after the next election, when they believe they could be in power as a single party.

It is another delay for a consultation that was meant to start in March, then delayed until the summer, and is now likely to wait until the autumn. It was dealing with some of the thorniest issues in aviation, including whether to build a third runway at Heathrow airport in west London, or perhaps build extra runways at Stansted or Gatwick. Some concerns have been expressed about the environmental impact of a third runway at Heathrow and the potential for it to damage people’s quality of life.

Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith, a well known environmentalist, said he would not stand as a candidate for the party at the next election if it supported a third runway.

London Mayor Boris Johnson also opposes…..

Read the full story at BBC News…..


BBC News
12 July 2012



[Telegraph] It can be cheaper to park a plane at an airport than a car, new research suggests.

Manchester Airport:  "Aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues".  Photo: Wikimedia

Manchester Airport: “Aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues”. Photo: Wikimedia

A study of 10 of Britain’s busiest airports shows that it could be cheaper to leave a light aircraft for a day at an airport than it would be to leave a car for the same amount of time.

The report cites Heathrow Terminal 5 as the most expensive, with a rate of £51.80 for a car to stay for 24 hours in the short-stay car park – although a Telegraph Travel query showed that the long-stay car park would cost £17.90 for the same time if booked in advance.

Manchester Airport charges £35 for a full day in a short-stay car park while a six-seater light aircraft would cost just £21 for the same period.

At Liverpool’s John Lennon Airport, the difference in parking costs was even wider, the study suggested, citing £10.72 as the price for a light aircraft compared to £39.99 for a car.

At Edinburgh airport it costs £23.50 to park a car and £11.90 to park a plane for 24 hours.

At Glasgow airport it is £21 for a car, and £11.52 for a plane. At Birmingham it is £22.50 for a car and £10.80 for a plane, while at Bristol it is £25 for a car and £17 for a plane.

Only at Luton Airport is plane parking more expensive than car parking, at £38.88 against £36 for a car.

Russell Craig of Manchester airport told the Independent, which conducted the study: “Years ago airports made all their money from the planes. Now at Manchester, aviation income makes up less than half of our revenues. To be able to keep investing, you’ve got to find new revenue streams and some of that is car parking. But pre-booking is the way to save money. The turn-up prices are what they are.”

Paul Watters of the AA said: “These are incredible findings that sadly may not come as a surprise to drivers who often have to pay eye-watering sums for parking in……

Read the full story at The Daily Telegraph….


By 
29th June, 2012