Archive for the ‘Gatwick’ Category


[Telegraph] London hubs experienced the most flight delays among airports in Britain between July and September last year, with nearly a third of passengers (31 per cent) delayed at the capital’s five airports last summer, new figures from the Civil Aviation Authority reveal.

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

Gatwick was the worst, with 43 per cent of its summer flights departing at least 15 minutes behind schedule, followed by Luton and Heathrow, ranked second and fourth worst overall, respectively.

Stansted and London City Airport fared best among London airports, finishing in 10th and 19th place, while Jersey and Manchester rounded out the top five UK airports with the most delays in the third quarter of last year.

Britain’s airports had its busiest summer ever, with more than 78 million passengers passing through one during the three summer months. The result was the worst flight punctuality of any summer period since 2010.

On-time flight performance dropped three per cent to 73 per cent, while the average delay time per flight across the 24 airports surveyed was 15 minutes, a one-minute increase on the same period in 2014.

“Airlines are accommodating the continuing strong passenger demand by carrying the extra passengers on larger aircraft, rather than increasing the number of flights significantly,” said Tim Johnson, CAA Policy Director.

“The strong passenger demand and a……

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..

 


The Telegraph
9th March, 2016


 

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[Sky News] Passengers are told to contact their airlines for the latest information after the runway is shut for over an hour to all flights.

https://i1.wp.com/media.skynews.com/media/images/generated/2013/10/2/262595/default/v1/gatwick-aerial-1-736x414.jpg

Image: Sky News Site

At least 19 incoming flights were diverted and dozens more delayed following a suspected oil spillage on the runway at London’s Gatwick Airport.

No planes were allowed to land or take off from around 10.15am on Monday until the runway reopened just over an hour later.

The airport urged passengers to check for an update on individual flights directly with their airlines.

An airport spokesman said “Arriving and departing flights recommenced from Gatwick at 11.38am.

“The runway closure has caused some flights to be diverted to other airports in the area and there will be delays to some departing flights

“Friends and family waiting for passengers should contact the relevant airline for the latest information.”

Details of the spillage, and its cause, were not disclosed, but reports suggested oil had leaked from a jet on landing.

Some passengers complained about…..

Read the full story here…..

 


Sky News
29th February, 2016



[The Guardian] Price comparison study finds the likes of Ryanair and easyJet charging more than triple the supermarket price for popular food and drink brands.

 Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy

Low cost airlines are hiking up the price of snacks and drinks by more than 1,000% compared with everyday prices, according to research that shows that a 12p cup-a-soup sachet can cost passengers as much as £2.50.

A comparison of six major budget airlines serving the UK market found huge price increases on basic refreshments, with most carriers charging £2.60 for a tea and £1.80 for a 500ml bottle of water.

Ryanair, perceived by most as the airline offering the lowest seat prices, was found to be the most expensive when it came to on-board snacks, charging £2.34 for a bottle of water and £1.56 for a chocolate bar.

Passengers on a Ryanair flight could find themselves paying £1.96 for a 200ml can of cola, and £2.34 for a 160g bag of gummy sweets.

However, Ryanair is by no means alone in……

Read more at the The Guardian……….

 


The Guardian
Friday 126th February, 2016



[BBC News] Passengers are facing widespread flight disruption after a computer failure at the UK’s air traffic control centre.

Vicky Lane, a passenger on a grounded London to Dublin plane at Gatwick said: “We’ve been stuck on a Ryanair flight… for over an hour.

“The doors are open and we’re really cold. I’m not sure when we will be leaving.”

Another passenger, on a flight to Paris, said his plane had “circled around the Lake District for half an hour before turning back to Edinburgh”.

Ed Bott told the BBC he was: “Currently sitting on the tarmac. None the wiser. Waiting for news as to what’s happening.”

Aviation journalist David Learmount said the IT problem would cause “major disruption” but would be resolved by Saturday.

“This impacts not just people within the UK, it impacts flights heading here from anywhere – anything heading this way will be told some of them can’t be accepted, and they will have to go back to where they flew from or consider diverting to other countries,” he told the BBC.

The RAF – which has its own air traffic control systems – said the UK military was unaffected.

According to one travel expert, the compensation bill from the disruption could run into tens of millions.

“The airlines will already be racking up the costs,” Independent journalist Simon Calder told BBC News. “Simply refunding passengers’ fares is going to cost them hundreds of thousands of pounds.

“The airline also has an unlimited duty of care to put people up in hotels, to feed them and everything else, until they can get them to their destination.”

Read the full story here at BBC News….

 


BBC News
12th Dec, 2014

 


 

 

 

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[Daily Telegraph] As many as 13 planes flying over Europe vanish from radar screens in an “unprecedented” series of blackouts that lasted 25 minutes with claims air traffic control could have been hacked.

So far experts are at a loss to explain what caused the aircraft to disappear

An air-safety investigation has been launched after 13 planes flying over Europe disappeared from radar screens in two “unprecedented” blackouts, leading to reports stating air traffic control systems had been hacked.

The aircraft went missing from screens across the region in early June, leaving air traffic controllers with no information about their position, direction and height – instead relying on voice communication alone.

Air traffic control centres in Austria, southern Germany, the Czech Republic and Slovakia all reported the same problem with each period of interference lasting around 25 minutes but varying from flight to flight.

Marcus Pohanka, from Austro Control, described the incidents, which occurred on June 5 and June 10 as “unprecedented,” although the authorities stressed that all the aircraft involved continued with their flights as normal.

Concerns over air safety and radar have been heightened since the disappearance of a Malaysian Airlines flight in March.

Read the full story at The Daily Telegraph…..

 


The Daily Telegraph

13th June, 2014

 


 


[BBC News] People in the South East will help shape the plans for Gatwick’s proposed second runway, the airport has said.

The proposed second runway at Gatwick is being considered by the Airports Commission. Photo: Gatwick Airport Ltd

The proposal is one of three Airports Commission options for expanding UK airport capacity. The other two involve building at Heathrow.

A six-week consultation starts on 4 April with 16 exhibitions in towns and villages in Kent, Sussex and Surrey.

Gatwick Airport said it wanted to get opinions on its three runway options to help “refine and improve” them.

Letters are to be sent to homes and businesses in the three counties giving details of the events.

Questions within the consultation will cover a range of topics including environmental, economic and social considerations.

Stewart Wingate, CEO of London Gatwick, said: “The views of the local community are an essential element of shaping Gatwick’s second runway options.

“Therefore it is important we hear from as many people as possible through our consultation so that we can consider local opinions in our refined runway proposals.”

The exhibitions will be held in Crawley, Rusper, Smallfield, Ifield, Lingfield, Horsham, Crowborough, East Grinstead, Reigate, Crawley Down, Horley, Charlwood, Dorking, Edenbridge, Felbridge, Epsom.

Read the full story at BBC News…..


BBC News
18th march, 2014


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[Metro] Heathrow Airport has denied claims four planes in British airspace made ‘mayday’ distress calls as they came close to running out of fuel while battling gale-force winds.

Planes that were unable to land at either Gatwick or Heathrow on Friday were diverted to Manchester and met by emergency response teams.

It had been reported by the Sunday Times that three of the four planes made distress calls after they thought their reserve fuel was coming to an end.

In addition, it was thought that another, an American Airlines flight, had experienced problems with its rudder.

However, a spokesperson for Heathrow said this morning: ‘The story in the Sunday Times is untrue. There were no mayday or distress calls received at Heathrow.

‘Due to high cross winds some aircraft were diverted to other UK airports that have spare runway capacity.’

Read the full story at Metro……


BBC News
17th Jan, 2014


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[BBC NewsRyanair has warned that profits this year may miss its forecast.

Ryanair says it will make aggressive price cuts

Ryanair says it will make aggressive price cuts

Europe’s biggest low-cost carrier says that profits may miss or be at the lower end of its range of 570m to 600m euros (£480m to £508m).

Ryanair said there had been a dip in ticket prices and booking levels for September, October and November.

Its shares plunged 13% on the news and other airline shares were hit too, with Easyjet falling 6% and British Airways owner IAG Group down almost 4%.

Lower fares
Ryanair says the weakness of European economies is partly to blame as well as price cutting by rival airlines.

In a conference call chief executive Michael O’Leary said: “We are going to respond to this by being out there first and being aggressive in fare response”.

He said that Ryanair will offer its £14.99 one way fare on up to 1,000 routes in September, October and November. That is up from 600 routes over the summer.

It is also launching an advertising campaign in the Republic of Ireland and the UK.

Investor surprise
Mr O’Leary said the weakness of the pound was hurting profits as 25% of the airline’s sales are made in sterling.

“This is a surprise statement from Ryanair and comes contrary to some of the commentary from the peer group and indeed Ryanair’s own commentary at its June investor days,” said Donal O’Neill, analyst with Goodbody stockbrokers.

To compensate for the weak demand, Ryanair will ground 70 to 80 aircraft during the winter months, after initially expecting to ground just 50.

That should mean its annual seat capacity will be 81 million seats, still up 2-3% on last year.

Read the original story at BBC News …..

 


BBC News
4th September, 2013



[Airport informer] If  you have to occasionally collect friends and family from Gatwick Airport‘s terminals, from July 1st you need to dig further in your pockets and pay for the privilege ….. and subsidise the taxi industry.

Minimum parking charges will rise from £1.50 to £3.00 to subsidise taxi & chauffeur driven cars

Minimum parking charges will rise from £1.50 to £3.00 to subsidise taxi & chauffeur driven cars. Image is for editorial purposes: Gatwick Airport Ltd

Gatwick Airport is planning a major shakeup of the Gatwick meet and greet industry.

Approved Operator Scheme

A recent consultation period has ended hosted held by Gatwick Airport in partnership with West Sussex County Council, Surrey Trading Standards and a number of meet and greet companies operating at the airport, the airport plans to introduce an approved ‘operator scheme’ and has launched a consultation period for meet and greet operators.

The aim is to ….

  • Reduce forecourt congestion by limiting meet and greet operations to specific, controlled areas
  • Expands the ‘user pays’ principle to cover meet and greet parking
  • Address the issue of sub-standard meet and greet operators at Gatwick by only allowing meet and greet companies that are part of the ‘approved operator’ scheme to operate at Gatwick
  • Recognise meet and greet operators that meet minimum customer service standards and ensure passengers can identify these operators.

The trouble is with these fine principles is that everyone now has to pay more to collect their loved ones as well.

In the words of the Gatwick Airport Ltd, in their full findings published here…  

Any individual not in the Approved Operator scheme will not be allowed to use the dedicated areas …, and will have to operate from the non-dedicated areas in the Multi-Story Car Park …. paying the regular tariff.

By the way the regular tariff has just had it’s minimum charges raised by 100%

Why, well in the words of Julia Gregory, Gatwick Airport’s head of Surface Transport….

“The implication for regular passengers using the forecourt is that the rules in place today will be more strictly enforced, that is to say that the forecourts must be for drop-off only, and any pick-ups should be carried out in the short-stay car park. If the scheme achieves its objectives, customers using the forecourts to drop-off friends/family will also benefit through better management of the traffic on the forecourts, and therefore shorter waiting times.”

she continues….

There have been changes to the tariff for the short-stay car parks, the key change is that the entry price point is now 0-30 minute at £3.00 rather than 0-15 minutes at £1.50. This change brings us in line with all the other main London airports, and we expect the vast majority of short-stay users to be unaffected (as most people take longer than 15 minutes to use the short-stays).

In effect the public will subsidise taxi & chauffeur driven car companies 

“This price change also allows us to offer discounted rates to the ‘Approved Operators’ that use the short-stay car parks, so forms a key part of the scheme. “

“expect …..push-back from customers”

“……this will have most impact from 1st July when the new rules on the forecourt start to be strictly enforced. In particular I expect there to be push-back from customers who today pick-up friends and family on the forecourt in contravention of the signage in place – they will not be allowed to do so from 1st July”.

In conclusion, from July 1st, bring some money….

You just know that when an auspicious entity like Gatwick Airport Ltd or a local council extols the virtues of a scheme to improve things……. it’s going to cost you more money somewhere along the line….

Don’t forget… Gatwick is “Your London Airport”


Airport informer
5th June, 2013



[BBC NewsRyanair has announced record profits this week, and the purchase of 175 new Boeing airliners. It’s evidently one of Europe’s most successful airlines at present – but has it even so been blowing its own trumpet a bit too much?

Ryanair prides itself on turning around flights quickly.

Ryanair prides itself on turning around flights quickly. Photo Wikipedia

Ever heard the cheerful jingle on a Ryanair plane as it touches down on the runway?

“Last year over 90% of Ryanair flights landed on time, beating every other European airline.”

Quite a boast. According to the statistics that Ryanair puts out itself, they achieved 90% punctuality last year, and have done for the last few years.

But we only have their word for it. There is scant data available to the public on airline punctuality.

The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority does collect data on flights arriving and departing from 10 UK airports. It defines “on time” as being within 15 minutes of its stated arrival time.

A website called flightontime.info crunched that data and worked out that Ryanair fell short of 90%, achieving only 83% at these 10 airports.

Taking the figures for 2012, bmi regional was the most punctual. Eleven other airlines also beat Ryanair’s 83% punctuality record.

Ryanair’s overall punctuality score – taking into account its flights landing at or taking off from other airports around Europe – could easily be higher than 83%, says Jim Paton, senior lecturer in the Department of Air Transport at Cranfield University.

“A big proportion of their network in Europe is operations to small airports that don’t suffer from air traffic congestion, as would be the case around London and Paris,” he says. This makes it easier to avoid delays.

He adds that Ryanair flies to airports where the facilities are relatively close to the runway, so the plane doesn’t spend several minutes taxiing, as it would often have to at airports such as Schiphol in Amsterdam.

The airline says: “Ryanair’s published monthly punctuality is calculated as the percentage of all (approx 42,000 on average) Ryanair flights in any month, at all 180 airports, which land ahead of, on, or within 15 minutes of scheduled arrival time.”

Punctuality statistics published by third parties are unreliable because their data is based on estimates or incomplete samples, which exclude certain airports, flights or airlines, the company adds.

But the Ryanair jingle also says it is “beating every other European airline” on punctuality. Where does this idea come from?

Ryanair says it is comparing its own punctuality figures with “the most recent Association of European Airlines published statistics”.

However, that organisation has not published any new figures since 2009.

In addition, it has only 32 members. Although those members include many big airlines, more than 200 airlines in Europe are not members – including Ryanair.

So there is no public data that proves this claim. And even if there were, it might be hard to take at face value because of a phenomenon known as “schedule padding”.

This is when airlines (or other transport companies) stretch their published journey times in order to…..

Read the rest of this feature at BBC News…..


Charlotte McDonald
BBC News
26th May, 2013