Archive for the ‘Heathrow’ Category


[Airport Informer] There are no words that we can add to report on this outrage today, other than to say that our thoughts remain with all of those directly and indirectly affected this morning. 

Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy

    Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy.

 


Airport Informer
22nd March, 2016


 

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[Telegraph] London hubs experienced the most flight delays among airports in Britain between July and September last year, with nearly a third of passengers (31 per cent) delayed at the capital’s five airports last summer, new figures from the Civil Aviation Authority reveal.

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

Gatwick was the worst, with 43 per cent of its summer flights departing at least 15 minutes behind schedule, followed by Luton and Heathrow, ranked second and fourth worst overall, respectively.

Stansted and London City Airport fared best among London airports, finishing in 10th and 19th place, while Jersey and Manchester rounded out the top five UK airports with the most delays in the third quarter of last year.

Britain’s airports had its busiest summer ever, with more than 78 million passengers passing through one during the three summer months. The result was the worst flight punctuality of any summer period since 2010.

On-time flight performance dropped three per cent to 73 per cent, while the average delay time per flight across the 24 airports surveyed was 15 minutes, a one-minute increase on the same period in 2014.

“Airlines are accommodating the continuing strong passenger demand by carrying the extra passengers on larger aircraft, rather than increasing the number of flights significantly,” said Tim Johnson, CAA Policy Director.

“The strong passenger demand and a……

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..

 


The Telegraph
9th March, 2016


 


[BBC News] United Continental is facing a challenge from two shareholders calling for changes to the airline’s board.

Altimeter and PAR said the airline has done little to improve performance

Altimeter and PAR said the airline has done little to improve performance

Altimeter and PAR said they would put forward six new board members for election at United’s annual meeting.

They blamed an “entrenched board” on the airline’s failure to make progress.

But United’s chairman Henry Meyer said the shareholders had ignored attempts the board had made to engage them.

Together Altimeter and PAR control 7.1% of United’s shares.

The investors object to United’s decision, on Monday, to expand the size of its board with three new members.

“Yesterday’s last-ditch effort – adding just three people to its now 15-person board – is a cynical attempt to preserve power by this entrenched board,” said Brad Gerstner chief executive of Altimeter.

United announced its chief executive officer Oscar Munoz will return to full time work on 14 March after recovering from a heart attack in October.

Read the full story here at BBC News……

 


BBC News
9th March, 2016



[BBC News] Passengers are facing widespread flight disruption after a computer failure at the UK’s air traffic control centre.

Vicky Lane, a passenger on a grounded London to Dublin plane at Gatwick said: “We’ve been stuck on a Ryanair flight… for over an hour.

“The doors are open and we’re really cold. I’m not sure when we will be leaving.”

Another passenger, on a flight to Paris, said his plane had “circled around the Lake District for half an hour before turning back to Edinburgh”.

Ed Bott told the BBC he was: “Currently sitting on the tarmac. None the wiser. Waiting for news as to what’s happening.”

Aviation journalist David Learmount said the IT problem would cause “major disruption” but would be resolved by Saturday.

“This impacts not just people within the UK, it impacts flights heading here from anywhere – anything heading this way will be told some of them can’t be accepted, and they will have to go back to where they flew from or consider diverting to other countries,” he told the BBC.

The RAF – which has its own air traffic control systems – said the UK military was unaffected.

According to one travel expert, the compensation bill from the disruption could run into tens of millions.

“The airlines will already be racking up the costs,” Independent journalist Simon Calder told BBC News. “Simply refunding passengers’ fares is going to cost them hundreds of thousands of pounds.

“The airline also has an unlimited duty of care to put people up in hotels, to feed them and everything else, until they can get them to their destination.”

Read the full story here at BBC News….

 


BBC News
12th Dec, 2014

 


 

 

 

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[BBC News] An unidentified drone came close to hitting a plane as it landed at Heathrow, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has confirmed.

An Airbus A320 pilot reported seeing a helicopter-style drone as the jet was 700 feet off the ground on its approach to the runway at 1416 GMT on 22 July.

The CAA has not identified the airline or how close the drone came to the plane, which can carry 180 people.

It gave the incident an “A” rating, meaning a “serious risk of collision”.

This is the highest incident rating the CAA can give.

Investigators were unable to identify the drone, which did not appear on air traffic control radar and disappeared after the encounter.

In May the pilot of an ATR 72 turbo-prop plane reported seeing a helicopter drone only 80 feet away as he approached Southend airport at a height of 1,500 feet.

The incidents have prompted a warning from the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) that the rapid increase in the number of drones operated by amateur enthusiasts now poses “a real risk” to commercial aircraft.

The association’s general secretary, Jim McAuslan said drones could cause a repeat of the “Hudson River experience”, when a plane was forced to land in water in New York in 2009 after birds were sucked into its engines.

“The risk of a 10 kilogram object hitting a plane is a real one that pilots are very concerned about” he said.

“A small drone could be a risky distraction for a pilot coming into land and cause serious damage if they hit one.”

Sales of drones have increased rapidly, with UK sales running at a rate of between 1,000 and 2,000 every month.

They are expected to be very popular as Christmas presents.

They cost as little as £35 for a smaller model – more advanced drones capable of carrying a high definition camera and travelling at 45 miles per hour cost almost £3,000.

Only a very small minority of people operating drones have attended training courses in how to fly them.

A spokesman for the CAA said it had to depend on people using their common sense when they operated drones.

He said the current level of risk should be “kept in perspective” but warned that breaking laws governing the use of drones could potentially threaten commercial aircraft.

“People using unmanned aircraft need to think, use common sense and take responsibility for them”, he said.

“There are rules which have the force of law and have to be followed.”

Drones may not be flown higher than 400 feet or further than 500 metres from the operator, and they must not go within 50 metres of people, vehicles or buildings.

There are exclusion zones around airports and the approaches to them for drones weighing more than seven kilograms.

Mr McAuslan said there was an urgent need for rules to be tightened before much larger unmanned cargo planes – potentially the size of a Boeing 737 – took to the skies.

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC News
7th December, 2014



[International Airport Review] Heathrow Airport Holdings (HAH) is reported to be planning to sell off Southampton, Glasgow and Aberdeen Airports by the end of the year.

The sale would mean that HAH, formerly British Airports Authority (BAA), would be left with just London Heathrow Airport. Photo: Wikipedia

The sale would mean that HAH, formerly British Airports Authority (BAA), would be left with just London Heathrow Airport. Reports claim that the sale would be in order to fund further development projects at the world’s third busiest airport.

A statement from HAH read: “Over recent months Heathrow Airport Holdings group shareholders and management have been considering their strategic position in relation to our three airports, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Southampton.

“As a result the group is now formally entering a sale process. While there is currently no certainty that a sale will be concluded, the group intends to work towards completing a transaction by the end of the year.”

In addition to London Heathrow, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Southampton, BAA once also owned Gatwick, Stansted and Edinburgh Airports as well, but following a performance inquiry by the Competition Commission (now the Competition and Markets Authority), BAA were ruled to sell Gatwick, Stansted and either Glasgow or Edinburgh Airports in order to break up the monopoly.

Following the ruling, Global Infrastructure Partners purchased Gatwick Airport in 2009 and Edinburgh in 2012, and Stansted was purchased by Manchester Airport Group in 2013.

 

Read the original story at International Airport Review…..

 


International Airport Review
7th August, 2014
 


 


[Euractiv.com] Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev threatened on Tuesday (5 August) to retaliate for the grounding of a subsidiary of national airline Aeroflot because of EU sanctions, with one newspaper reporting that European flights to Asia over Siberia could be banned.

Low-cost carrier Dobrolyot, operated by Aeroflot, suspended all flights last week after its airline leasing agreement was cancelled under European Union sanctions because it flies to Crimea, a region Russia annexed from Ukraine in March.

“We should discuss possible retaliation,” Medvedev said at a meeting with the Russian transport minister and a deputy chief executive of Aeroflot.

The business daily Vedomosti reported that Russia may restrict or ban European airlines from flying over Siberia on Asian routes, a move that would impose costs on European carriers by making flights take longer and require more fuel.

Vedomosti quoted unnamed sources as saying the foreign and transport ministries were discussing the action, which would put European carriers at a disadvantage to Asian rivals but would also cost Russia money it collects in overflight fees.

Shares in Aeroflot – which according to Vedomosti gets around $300 million a year in fees paid by foreign airlines flying over Siberia – tumbled after the report, closing down 5.9% compared with a 1.4% drop on the broad index.

Siberia ban would force EU carriers into costly detours

At the height of the Cold War, most Western airlines were barred from flying through Russian airspace to Asian cities, and instead had to operate via the Gulf or the US airport of Anchorage, Alaska on the polar route.

European carriers now fly over Siberia on their rapidly growing routes to countries such as China, Japan and South Korea, paying the fees which have been subject to a long dispute between Brussels and Moscow.

Vedomosti quoted one source as saying a ban could cost airlines like Lufthansa, British Airways and Air France €1 billion over three months, but industry experts said that figure was probably too high.

Avoiding Russian airspace would probably be 25-50% more expensive than paying fees for transit, said Russian aviation consultant Boris Ryabok, estimating European airlines would lose around $100-200 million per year, less than the cost to Russia of the lost fees.

Lufthansa said it operates about 180 flights a week through Siberian airspace but declined further comment, as did British Airways.

The EU has widened its sanctions after last month’s downing of a Malaysian airliner over territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Moscow rebels, with the loss of 298 lives.

 

Read the full story at Euractiv.com…..

 


Euactiv.com
6th Aug, 2014



[Daily Telegraph] As many as 13 planes flying over Europe vanish from radar screens in an “unprecedented” series of blackouts that lasted 25 minutes with claims air traffic control could have been hacked.

So far experts are at a loss to explain what caused the aircraft to disappear

An air-safety investigation has been launched after 13 planes flying over Europe disappeared from radar screens in two “unprecedented” blackouts, leading to reports stating air traffic control systems had been hacked.

The aircraft went missing from screens across the region in early June, leaving air traffic controllers with no information about their position, direction and height – instead relying on voice communication alone.

Air traffic control centres in Austria, southern Germany, the Czech Republic and Slovakia all reported the same problem with each period of interference lasting around 25 minutes but varying from flight to flight.

Marcus Pohanka, from Austro Control, described the incidents, which occurred on June 5 and June 10 as “unprecedented,” although the authorities stressed that all the aircraft involved continued with their flights as normal.

Concerns over air safety and radar have been heightened since the disappearance of a Malaysian Airlines flight in March.

Read the full story at The Daily Telegraph…..

 


The Daily Telegraph

13th June, 2014

 


 


[DFNIonline.com] London Heathrow airport chief executive officer Colin Matthews is to stand down later this year.

Colin Matthews has been at the helm since March 2008. Image: BBC News 

Matthews joined the airport in March 2008 and under his leadership the proportion of passengers rating their journey through Heathrow as good or excellent increased from less than 50% to more than 75%.

Terminal 5 has been voted by passengers as the world’s best airport terminal for the past three years and the airport has constructed the new T2 which is set to open in June.

London Heathrow was also official gateway for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the option for a third runway was shortlisted in December 2013 by the Sir Howard Davies’ Airports Commission.

Matthews said: “It has been a privilege to serve as CEO of Heathrow for the last six years. With a strong leadership team, the company continues to raise standards of passenger service, improve efficiency and reduce costs.

The opening of terminal two: The Queen’s Terminal in June this year is a further important step in the transformation of Heathrow and long-term prospects are bright following the decision of the airport’s Commission to shortlist our proposal for a new runway.

So once terminal two has opened later this year, I have decided the time is right to pass on the baton.”

Read the full story at DFNIonline.com…..

 


DFNIonline.com
31st March, 2014

Andrew Pentol


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[Reuters] London’s Heathrow said on Tuesday it would not appeal a decision by the regulator to impose a cap on the prices Britain’s biggest airport can charge airlines, adding it did not believe other parties would appeal the ruling either.

“We are focussed on delivering our business plan for the period from 2014-18 and further improving Heathrow for passengers,” the airport said in a brief statement.

Heathrow had warned in January that it could struggle to grow its business after the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) ruled it must set its prices at 1.5 percent below inflation from April 2014 after finding that the airport – Europe’s busiest – had too much market power.

Read the original story at Reuters…..

 


(Reporting by Kate Holton, Editing by Paul Sandle)
Reuters
1st April, 2014


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