Archive for the ‘Russia’ Category


[NBCCHICARGO.COM] A cyber security expert tells NBC5 Investigates he has found a way to hack into the satellite communications systems used in multiple industries.

“These devices are wide open right now,” said Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant based in Madrid, Spain with IOActive.

"For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels," said Santamarta

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. Image: nbcchicargo.com

Pilots, ship captains and military personnel rely on satellite networks to communicate when there are no phone lines or wireless networks available.

“If someone can see the password or that user name it’s over,” he added. “Those vulnerabilities can be exploited to remotely compromise those devices.

Santamarta said he used something called reverse engineering — or decoding — to hack satellite communications equipment used in aerospace, maritime and military industries.

“In the military sector they use satellite terminals for combat units,” said Santamarta. “They normally encrypt the radio [transmissions] they send. But we can disrupt the satellite communications channel so we can prevent combat units [from asking] for help if they are being attacked.”

And in the maritime sector, satellite communications are used to send and receive vital information that affects the safety of the crew.

“If they are being attacked by terrorists, or they are suffering fire, they can send a distress call,” he said. “But we found we can modify the firmware in some of those terminals, so we can prevent a crew from sending a distress call.”

Santamarta recently published a 25-page report and went public with his findings at Defcon 22 – the largest hacking conference in the world – held earlier this month in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. “In some cases you need physical access to compromise the devices we analyzed, but in other cases you can use Wi-Fi or the entertainment network to access that device.”

His research took place in a lab setting and has not been tested on an actual commercial plane. But his findings have raised concerns in the aviation industry.

Read the full story at NBCCHICARGO.OM here….

 


NBCCHICARGO.COM
21st August, 2014


 

 

 

Advertisements

[Euractiv.com] Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev threatened on Tuesday (5 August) to retaliate for the grounding of a subsidiary of national airline Aeroflot because of EU sanctions, with one newspaper reporting that European flights to Asia over Siberia could be banned.

Low-cost carrier Dobrolyot, operated by Aeroflot, suspended all flights last week after its airline leasing agreement was cancelled under European Union sanctions because it flies to Crimea, a region Russia annexed from Ukraine in March.

“We should discuss possible retaliation,” Medvedev said at a meeting with the Russian transport minister and a deputy chief executive of Aeroflot.

The business daily Vedomosti reported that Russia may restrict or ban European airlines from flying over Siberia on Asian routes, a move that would impose costs on European carriers by making flights take longer and require more fuel.

Vedomosti quoted unnamed sources as saying the foreign and transport ministries were discussing the action, which would put European carriers at a disadvantage to Asian rivals but would also cost Russia money it collects in overflight fees.

Shares in Aeroflot – which according to Vedomosti gets around $300 million a year in fees paid by foreign airlines flying over Siberia – tumbled after the report, closing down 5.9% compared with a 1.4% drop on the broad index.

Siberia ban would force EU carriers into costly detours

At the height of the Cold War, most Western airlines were barred from flying through Russian airspace to Asian cities, and instead had to operate via the Gulf or the US airport of Anchorage, Alaska on the polar route.

European carriers now fly over Siberia on their rapidly growing routes to countries such as China, Japan and South Korea, paying the fees which have been subject to a long dispute between Brussels and Moscow.

Vedomosti quoted one source as saying a ban could cost airlines like Lufthansa, British Airways and Air France €1 billion over three months, but industry experts said that figure was probably too high.

Avoiding Russian airspace would probably be 25-50% more expensive than paying fees for transit, said Russian aviation consultant Boris Ryabok, estimating European airlines would lose around $100-200 million per year, less than the cost to Russia of the lost fees.

Lufthansa said it operates about 180 flights a week through Siberian airspace but declined further comment, as did British Airways.

The EU has widened its sanctions after last month’s downing of a Malaysian airliner over territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Moscow rebels, with the loss of 298 lives.

 

Read the full story at Euractiv.com…..

 


Euactiv.com
6th Aug, 2014



[airportcybersecurity.com] ServiceTec is delighted to announce the launch of a new website for its cyber security division, Airport CyberSec. 

AirportCyberSecurity

Airport CyberSec offers airports all over the world a full range of Cyber Security services designed to keep their staff, passengers and data safe.

Airport CyberSec’s cyber security experts work alongside airport IT and security teams to help protect against all aspects of cyber-attack.

Aside from an overview of the services offered by Airport CyberSec, the site will feature expert opinion and insight on the latest developments in the field of cyber security from the team, including Dr. John McCarthy, a world renowned authority on cyber-security strategy, development and Airport CyberSec services include:

Social Engineering Training, to protect against the practice of manipulating people into subverting security procedures or divulging confidential information

CyberIMMUNE, a unique software that mitigates the threat of malware by disabling its ability to write to disk and therefore preventing it from delivering its payload. This unique and powerful tool offers greater protection than any alternative against a zero-day attack – a threat that exploits a previously unknown vulnerability, i.e. one that is so new that the airports IT security team have had no time to address it.

Network & Web-site Security – the integrity of an airport’s network, intranet and website as well as its data security policies will quite obviously have a major influence on that airport’s vulnerability to cyber-attack. Airport CyberSec offers network security audits to test the integrity of an airport’s entire IT infrastructure.

Cyber Security Policies – Airport Cybersec can  offer assistance in the preparation and reviewing of cybersecurity policies based on world-wide best practice.

Monitoring Compliance with CyberSAFE – once best practice cyber-security policies are established staff may know what they should do, however it is also necessary to ensure staff are compliant with the policy on a day to day basis. CyberSAFE assists with both monitoring and enforcement.

 

The website can be found at www.airportcybersecurity.com

 

 


ABOUT SERVICETEC

ServiceTec specialises exclusively in the provision of Managed IT Services to the world’s airport and ,airline industries, and has been doing so since 1989. ServiceTec operates globally, with headquarters in the UK and the USA, and offices in Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and Japan.

Airports served include JFK, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Nashville, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Berlin,

Please visit http://www.servicetec.com


Servicetec Airport Services
Letchworth, UK – 27th March 2014


Enhanced by Zemanta

[The Moscow Times] British budget airline easyJet on Wednesday started selling tickets for a Moscow-Manchester service to begin in March, as the no-frills carrier looks set to slash the cost of flying between Russia and Britain.

easyJet plans to launch its low-cost Moscow-London and Moscow- Manchester flights in March

easyJet plans to launch its low-cost Moscow-London and Moscow- Manchester flights in March. Photo: Wikipedia

A one-way trip from Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport to Manchester, the third largest city in Britain, starts at $72.49, easyJet director Paul Simmons told The Moscow Times. The price for Moscow-London flights, with sales set to begin in mid-January, will be similar.

As of March 18, there will be four daily flights between Moscow and London, leaving London at 7 a.m. and 2:10 p.m. and Moscow at 2:30 p.m. and 9:40 p.m., Simmons said. The Moscow-Manchester service will operate on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

While there is a fixed quota for tickets sold at the starting price, easyJet operates a system whereby fares increase with demand, making them more expensive in peak periods.

The company’s first commercial flight from Manchester to Moscow is scheduled for March 28. By mid-afternoon in Moscow a one-way ticket on easyJet’s website was selling for £59.99 ($96.70).

As well as stealing market share from Russian carriers, easyJet also expects to boost the numbers of tourists and businessmen travelling between the two countries.

“We will grow the market,” Simmons said. “We tend to do that when we go to a new destination.”

And the company expects the new routes to be lucrative. easyJet could reap profits of up to $2.4 million flying 300,000 passengers annually, he said.

easyJet was awarded the right to operate the Moscow-London route from Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority in October, beating off competition from Richard Branson‘s Virgin Atlantic.

Under a bilateral agreement between Russia and Britain only four carriers can fly between the two countries’ capitals. A space became available earlier this year — for the first time since 1998 ……..

Read the full story at The Moscow Times…..

 


Moscow Times – By Howard Amos
14th Dec, 2012



[The Seattle Times] Russia’s attempt to reassert itself on the global aviation scene after a two-decade absence in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, hit turbulence in the tragic crash of one of its Sukhoi SuperJets in Indonesia, even if it was pilot error.

Superjet 100 prototype on its maiden flight, 19 May 2008.

Superjet 100 prototype on its maiden flight, 19 May 2008. Phot: Wikipedia

MOSCOW — President Vladimir Putin‘s ambition to revive Russia’s aerospace industry will hang on one question dominating the Sukhoi SuperJet crash probe in Indonesia this week: pilot or plane?

Investigators have located the remains of the 90-seat Russian-built aircraft that crashed into a mountainside on Wednesday with 45 people on board. Salvage crews also located the flight recorder, which may offer vital clues to the cause of the crash, after the same jet had performed flawlessly on earlier flights piloted by an expert crew.

“There’s a very good chance this crash wasn’t related to the design of the plane, but battling negative perceptions is very difficult,” said Richard Aboulafia, vice president of Teal Group in Fairfax, Va., an aviation-consulting company.

At stake is Russia’s attempt to reassert itself on the global aviation scene after a two-decade absence after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The SuperJet, which carries about 100 passengers, was designed with Western partners and equipped with cutting-edge systems, as Russia seeks to win a slice of the regional jet market now…..

Read the full story at The Seattle Times……


Friday, May 11, 2012
By Andrea Rothman
Bloomberg News



 [Aviation Herald] This morning (Friday 11th May) search and rescue teams searching for the wreckage of a Russian built airliner on the slopes of Mount Salak finally reached the mountainous crash impact site and the wreckage below.  

More Large Images Here - Rescuers used ropes to lower themselves to the wreckage Photo: Aviation Herald

More Large Images Here – Rescuers used ropes to lower themselves to the wreckage Photo: Aviation Herald

Rescuers Make Sure but Slow Progress

The previous evening local police released some data stating that the rescue effort had engaged the services of over 1,300 personnel. Such a large force had been involved because of the sheer scale of the mountainous countryside in the area.

Access to the site by air is just not possible due to the extreme terrain locally.

It was taking up to 7 hours for the teams to climb the cliff face to reach the site of the incident.

Four search and rescue teams were formed, the first an advance group of  just 10 rescuers, the second consisted of  75 search and rescue experts. This was followed by a 3rd and 4th group which had a further 225 and 250 in the parties.

Once the area above the impact site was reached, rescuers then had to use ropes to descend down the opposite steep cliff face to lower themselves to the wreckage below. 

In a statement this afternoon, Indonesia’s President and a spokesperson for the rescue coordinators, announced in a press conference that 12 bodies have been discovered. The victims’ bodies were recovered and then flown out of the area,

The operation was suspended for the night after darkness fell.

 The Incident

The aircraft with 36 passengers and 6 crew plus 2 Sukhoi executives on board was flying from Jakarta’s Halim Perdanakusuma Airport on a round demonstration flight.

As it neared regions called Mount Salak and Bogor, about 40 miles south of Jakarta it vanished from radar and radio contact was lost. Indonesian air transport officials stated that the aircraft was flying at about 10,000 feet near Mount Salak at 3:30pm local time when the crew requested a descent to 6000 feet.

Radar contact was lost as the aircraft descended in a right hand turn, at the previously requested height between Mount Salak and Mount Gede. Mount Salak is 2,211 meters (7254 feet) high, nearby Mount Gede is 2,958 meters (9,705 feet) high.

Sukhoi’s Welcome Asia! road show

The Russian built Suhkoi Superjet 100 aircraft was on a promotional tour of Asia when it lost radio contact with local air traffic controllers in Western Indonesia earlier yesterday.

The Sukhoi aircraft arrived in Jakarta on May 8th 2012, on the fourth stop of a six-nation “Welcome Asia!” road show after having already been to Myanmar, Pakistan and Kazakhstan. It was supposed to head next to Laos and Vietnam.

Sukhoi is Russia’s major aircraft holding company, employing more than 26,000 people.

Read the original report and view large images at the Aviation Herald….


Reporting by Chris Newman
from the original story by the Aviation Herald
11th May, 2012


 


[Aviation Herald]  – UPDATED STORY HERE….

Search and rescue teams using helicopters this morning, suspect that they have found the wreckage of a Russian built airliner on the slopes of Mount Salak, about 5,300 feet up the mountainside.

Rescue teams are currently on the ground and only about 1km from the crash site. Picture: Aviation Herald

Ground based rescue and recovery teams are currently on their way to the crash site.

The first attempts to reach the crash site, including attempts to set rescuers down by helicopters had previously failed due to the extremely steep terrain. About 450 rescue personnel are currently moving towards the crash site by foot but had not reached the crash site before darkness fell. The rescue teams are currently only about 1km from the crash site.

The coordinator of the rescue operation said that the aircraft “appeared relatively intact from the air” however it is clear that is has received substantial damage after leaving a trail away from the crater down the slope, there was no sign of survivors from the air.

As rescuers have yet to reach the site the status of the occupants on board of the aircraft is still unknown. The rescue operation has been suspended for the night but will resume in the morning.

The aircraft with 36 passengers and 6 crew plus 2 Sukhoi executives on board was flying from Jakarta’s Halim Perdanakusuma Airport on a round demonstration flight. As it neared regions called Mount Salak and Bogor, about 40 miles south of Jakarta it vanished from radar and radio contact was lost.Indonesian air transport officials stated that the aircraft was flying at about 10,000 feet near Mount Salak at 3:30pm local time when the crew requested a descent to 6000 feet.

The request was granted by local air traffic control; this was the last contact that they had with the aircraft.

Radar contact was lost as the aircraft descended in a right hand turn, at the previously requested height between Mount Salak and Mount Gede.

Mount Salak is 2,211 meters (7254 feet) high, nearby Mount Gede is 2,958 meters (9,705 feet) high.

Sukhoi’s Welcome Asia! road show

The Russian built Suhkoi Superjet 100 aircraft was on a promotional tour of Asia when it lost radio contact with local air traffic controllers in Western Indonesia earlier yesterday.

The Sukhoi aircraft arrived in Jakarta on May 8th 2012, on the fourth stop of a six-nation “Welcome Asia!” road show after having already been to Myanmar, Pakistan and Kazakhstan. It was supposed to head next to Laos and Vietnam.

Sukhoi is Russia’s major aircraft holding company, employing more than 26,000 people.

See pictures taken near the scene and read the original report from the Aviation Herald….


Reporting by Chris Newman
from the original story by the Aviation Herald
10th May, 2012



[Aviation Herald] – UPDATED STORY HERE….

A Russian built Suhkoi Superjet 100 aircraft on a promotional tour of Asia lost radio contact with local air traffic controllers in Western Indonesia earlier today.

ukhoi Superjet 100 is designed for transportation of 98 passengers

Sukhoi Superjet 100 is designed for transportation of 98 passengers Photo: Wikipedia

The aircraft with 36 passengers and 6 crew plus 2 Sukhoi executives on board was flying from Jakarta’s Halim Perdanakusuma Airport on a round demonstration flight. As it neared regions called Mount Salak and Bogor, about 40 miles south of Jakarta it vanished from radar and radio contact was lost.

Indonesian air transport officials stated that the aircraft was flying at about 10,000 feet near Mount Salak at 3:30pm local time when the crew requested a descent to 6000 feet.

The request was granted by local air traffic control; this was the last contact that they had with the aircraft.

Radar contact was lost as the aircraft descended in a right hand turn, at the previously requested height between Mount Salak and Mount Gede.

Search flights had been initiated in the area but were suspended after nightfall. On the ground a search team was deployed, and arrived after nightfall in the Mount Salak area. They will be joined by a second team in the morning at first light.

Mount Salak is 2,211 meters (7254 feet) high, nearby Mount Gede is 2,958 meters (9,705 feet) high.

The Sukhoi aircraft arrived in Jakarta on May 8th 2012, on the fourth stop of a six-nation “Welcome Asia!” road show after having already been to Myanmar, Pakistan and Kazakhstan. It was supposed to head next to Laos and Vietnam.

Sukhoi is Russia’s major aircraft holding company, employing more than 26,000 people.

Read the original report from the Aviation Herald….


Reporting by Chris Newman
from the original story by the Aviation Herald
9th May, 2012



[BBC News Magazine] Rarely a week passes without passport queue woes in the UK or tales of overzealous security staff in the US. So has going through an airport become a horrible experience?

Airports were once an exciting window to the world.

Airports were once an exciting window to the world.

But with immigration services staff in the UK set to strike and passengers said to have waited for up to three hours for passport checks at Heathrow last week, for some the romance is over.

Across the Atlantic, the American airport experience has also been generating ire.

In April, a man stripped off in protest of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at Portland Airport and the father of a three-year-old boy was so enraged his son was patted down by an airport screenerin Chicago in 2010 he posted it on YouTube.

The rules have changed since then, but earlier this year the TSA had to apologise to two elderly women in their 80s after acknowledging agents violated procedures.

There are entire blogs dedicated to a whole array of airport gripes.

Common complaints include confusing signs, chaotic carousel crowding, rampant profiteering, having to remove shoes at security, lack of free wi-fi and lack of information on delays and cancellations.

So has going through an airport really become so terrible it has taken the thrill out of travelling – and if so how did it happen?

Mark Biwwa, 25, an online marketing professional from Malta, got so annoyed by a particularly bad experience at Luton Airport in 2011 he decided to immortalise it in a blog, Five Reasons Why I Hate Airports.

He says it…..

Read the full story at BBC News….


BBC News Magazine
May 8th, 2012



[San Francisco Chronicle] After many years of planning is preparing to start their landmark nonstop passenger and freight service from John F Kennedy Airport in New York to St. Petersburg Russia.

Balia will offer nonstop passenger and freight services from John F Kennedy Airport in New York to St. Petersburg Russia

Balia will offer nonstop passenger and freight services from John F Kennedy Airport in New York to St. Petersburg Russia. Photo: Baltia.com

Baltia staff are presently working on the rigorous FAA Air Carrier Certification process.

Baltia is the newest airline in the United States since Virgin America completed its FAA Certification and took to the skies in 2006.

Igor Dmitrowsky, President and CEO of BALTIA, has spent years pursuing his vision and passion to bring this airline to fruition.

CEO, "Baltia aims to provide the ultimate flying experience to its passengers and bring joy and excitement to flying"

CEO, “Baltia aims to provide the ultimate flying experience to its passengers and bring joy and excitement to flying”

“Baltia aims to provide the ultimate flying experience to its passengers and bring joy and excitement to flying”, he stated. Because Baltia is thoughtfully organized and efficient, the new airline is expected to be profitable from the start.

As a JFK based airline Baltia will provide hundreds of new employment opportunities in New York.

Baltia will take passengers back to the hay days of air travel with passenger service being…..

Read the full story at SF Gate…..


San Francisco Chronicle
Monday, May 7, 2012