Archive for the ‘Stansted’ Category


[Telegraph] London hubs experienced the most flight delays among airports in Britain between July and September last year, with nearly a third of passengers (31 per cent) delayed at the capital’s five airports last summer, new figures from the Civil Aviation Authority reveal.

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

A runway at Gatwick Airport, the worst for summer delays

Gatwick was the worst, with 43 per cent of its summer flights departing at least 15 minutes behind schedule, followed by Luton and Heathrow, ranked second and fourth worst overall, respectively.

Stansted and London City Airport fared best among London airports, finishing in 10th and 19th place, while Jersey and Manchester rounded out the top five UK airports with the most delays in the third quarter of last year.

Britain’s airports had its busiest summer ever, with more than 78 million passengers passing through one during the three summer months. The result was the worst flight punctuality of any summer period since 2010.

On-time flight performance dropped three per cent to 73 per cent, while the average delay time per flight across the 24 airports surveyed was 15 minutes, a one-minute increase on the same period in 2014.

“Airlines are accommodating the continuing strong passenger demand by carrying the extra passengers on larger aircraft, rather than increasing the number of flights significantly,” said Tim Johnson, CAA Policy Director.

“The strong passenger demand and a……

Read the full story at The Telegraph…..

 


The Telegraph
9th March, 2016


 

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[The Guardian] Price comparison study finds the likes of Ryanair and easyJet charging more than triple the supermarket price for popular food and drink brands.

 Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy

Low cost airlines are hiking up the price of snacks and drinks by more than 1,000% compared with everyday prices, according to research that shows that a 12p cup-a-soup sachet can cost passengers as much as £2.50.

A comparison of six major budget airlines serving the UK market found huge price increases on basic refreshments, with most carriers charging £2.60 for a tea and £1.80 for a 500ml bottle of water.

Ryanair, perceived by most as the airline offering the lowest seat prices, was found to be the most expensive when it came to on-board snacks, charging £2.34 for a bottle of water and £1.56 for a chocolate bar.

Passengers on a Ryanair flight could find themselves paying £1.96 for a 200ml can of cola, and £2.34 for a 160g bag of gummy sweets.

However, Ryanair is by no means alone in……

Read more at the The Guardian……….

 


The Guardian
Friday 126th February, 2016



[BBC News] Passengers are facing widespread flight disruption after a computer failure at the UK’s air traffic control centre.

Vicky Lane, a passenger on a grounded London to Dublin plane at Gatwick said: “We’ve been stuck on a Ryanair flight… for over an hour.

“The doors are open and we’re really cold. I’m not sure when we will be leaving.”

Another passenger, on a flight to Paris, said his plane had “circled around the Lake District for half an hour before turning back to Edinburgh”.

Ed Bott told the BBC he was: “Currently sitting on the tarmac. None the wiser. Waiting for news as to what’s happening.”

Aviation journalist David Learmount said the IT problem would cause “major disruption” but would be resolved by Saturday.

“This impacts not just people within the UK, it impacts flights heading here from anywhere – anything heading this way will be told some of them can’t be accepted, and they will have to go back to where they flew from or consider diverting to other countries,” he told the BBC.

The RAF – which has its own air traffic control systems – said the UK military was unaffected.

According to one travel expert, the compensation bill from the disruption could run into tens of millions.

“The airlines will already be racking up the costs,” Independent journalist Simon Calder told BBC News. “Simply refunding passengers’ fares is going to cost them hundreds of thousands of pounds.

“The airline also has an unlimited duty of care to put people up in hotels, to feed them and everything else, until they can get them to their destination.”

Read the full story here at BBC News….

 


BBC News
12th Dec, 2014

 


 

 

 

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[BBC News] RAF Typhoon jets have been launched to investigate an incident involving a civilian aircraft within UK airspace, the Ministry of Defence has said.

A reported on board incident created an alert: Picture Wikipedia

A reported on board incident created an alert and diverted the aircraft: Picture Wikipedia

A Pakistan International Airlines plane has been diverted from Manchester to Stansted Airport, a Manchester Airport spokesman said.

An Essex Police spokeswoman added: “An incident has occurred on an aircraft. Police and partners are responding.”

The BBC understands that the plane has now landed in Stansted.

The plane reportedly left Lahore at 09:35 local time. It was due in at Manchester at 1400 BST.

 

UPDATE at 14:55

The BBC understands that the plane has now landed in Stansted.

BBC defence correspondent Jonathan Beale said that police were expected to meet the plane at the airport. The plane, flight number PK709, reportedly left Lahore at 09:35 local time. It was due in at Manchester at 14:00 BST.

The MoD said responsibility for the incident had now passed to Essex Police and the Home Office. The MoD was not able to say how serious a threat there was on board.

An MoD spokesman said the incident was now a police matter and that “our involvement is over”.

He said Typhoon jets could be scrambled after the pilot or crew of a passenger aircraft sends out an emergency signal.

“The purpose of going up is to investigate what the situation is,” he said.

“Often when a Quick Reaction Alert aircraft is launched the details are not known, but it is known that a signal has been sent.

“Part of the purpose of sending a Typhoon up is to have a look and see what they can see.”

A Pakistan International Airlines spokesman Zufiqar Bijarani told CNN: “We have been told there may have been a bomb threat.” But he did not say if he had anything to confirm or deny this.

Stansted Airport said on Twitter that it was operating normally.

Pakistan International Airlines said there were 308 passengers on board, as well as 14 crew including pilots, with a mixture of Pakistani and British passport holders.

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC NEWS
24th May, 2013



[BBTN] Airports have warned of potential delays through immigration control on Wednesday (March 20) due to a strike by Border Force staff.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS. Photo: Wikipedia

Employees, who are members of the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union, are due to go on a 24-hour strike designed to coincide with tomorrow’s budget from chancellor George Osborne.

UK Border Agency said in a statement: “Our top priority is minimising disruption to our public-facing services and our public offices will remain open for business. We apologise for any disruption to services which result from this industrial action.”

Heathrow warned that arriving passengers “may experience some delays at immigration” but said it was not changing any flight schedules.

“The Home Office has assured us it has contingency plans in place to minimise any disruption caused by the strike,” said the airport. “We are operating a normal flight schedule and we are not advising passengers to change their plans.”

PCS workers around the UK are taking industrial action in protest at proposed cuts to pay, pensions and working conditions. The union said the timing of the strike was designed “to put maximum pressure on ministers who are refusing to talk to us”.

“Action will start with a 24-hour strike on budget day,” said the PCS. “When the chancellor stands up to deliver his budget we’ll be protesting across the UK.”

Stansted said its flights would be operating as normal but added they may be some delays at passport control.

UK Border Force has contingency plans in place and we will work with them to ensure any disruption to our passengers is kept to a minimum,” said the airport.

It was a similar message from Luton which advised incoming passengers to take a series of steps to ease any potential delays including the use of automatic e-Passport gates, having landing cards fully completed and staying in family groups.

For the latest updates on the strike from UKBA, CLICK HERE…..

Read the original story at Buying Business travel…..


Buying Business Travel
19th Mar, 2013



[Evening Standard] The new owners of Stansted today launched a battle of the skies as they vowed to take passengers from Heathrow and Gatwick after competing the £1.5bn purchase of the Essex airport.

Manchester Group promises flights to 40 new long-haul destinations including the US, Caribbean and the Middle East.

Manchester Group promises flights to 40 new long-haul destinations including the US, Caribbean and the Middle East. Photo: Wikipedia

They promised to take the airport, traditionally a stronghold of budget airlines, into the premier league with flights to 40 new long-haul destinations including the US, Caribbean and the Middle East.

Owners Manchester Airport Group (MAG) pledged to double annual passenger numbers 35 million, build new stands for the A380 superjumbos and spend £40m on new shops.

But MAG insisted there were no imminent plans to build another runway at the Essex airport – even though it is being considered by mayor Boris Johnson as a site for a “super-airport” to solve the southeast’s aviation capacity crisis.

Charlie Cornish, chief executive of Manchester Airport Group (MAG) said: “If we get the right level of customer experience and the right product, which is the right airlines flying the right planes at the right price, we will start to move volume around London. Some will always go to Heathrow and Gatwick but if it’s a strong product we hope to take volume not just from the north but the south” Mr Cornish said.

MAG calculates that 50 million people live within two hours’ drive of the Essex airport.

MAG purchased Stansted after Heathrow owner BAA was forced by the regulator to sell up to create more competition in the market.

The acquisition by MAG, which also own East Midlands and Bournemouth, includes a 35 per cent stake for…..

Read the full story at The Evening Standard…..

 


Evening Standard
Mar 1st, 2013



[BBC News] A proposal to expand Gatwick and Stansted airports so they can compete with Heathrow has been put forward by Gatwick Airport‘s chief executive.

Gatwick wants three airports to compete but campaigners want demand spread across the UK

Gatwick wants three airports to compete but campaigners want demand spread across the UK. Photo: Gatwick Airport Ltd

Stewart Wingate said both the airports in West Sussex and Essex should expand.

The plan would see three airports of a similar size competing with each other and spreading the economic benefit and environmental impact, he said.

But anti-expansion campaigners said the South East had enough air capacity and demand should be spread across the UK.

Several plans have been put forward to increase air capacity in London and the South East including expansion of Gatwick, Heathrow, and regional airports.

There are also three plans to build airports in the Thames Estuary off Kent, and a proposal to build a four-runway airport on Goodwin Sands near Deal.

Mr Wingate said: “What we’re promoting is a model which sees the airports of the South East competing with one another.

“What that means for us is a second runway going into Gatwick and subsequently a second runway going into Stansted.”

But John Byng, vice chairman of the Gatwick Area Conservation Campaign, said the prospect of a second Gatwick runway was “worrying” and added: “It will create much more noise and disturbance for local people.”

He said: “There are lots of services that would be further overstretched by the expansion of Gatwick and what’s more it’s not needed.

“There is plenty of capacity in the South East for the flights that are needed. There isn’t an airport in the country that’s full except Heathrow.

Read the full story on BBC News…..


BBC News
1st Feb, 2013



[BBC News] London’s Stansted Airport is being sold to the owner of Manchester Airport for £1.5bn, it has been announced.

Stansted's sale had been ordered by the Competition Commission.

Stansted’s sale had been ordered by the Competition Commission. Picture: Wikipedia

The airport is being sold by Heathrow Airport Holdings, formerly called BAA, which will continue to own London Heathrow, Southampton, Aberdeen, and Glasgow airports.

Heathrow Airport Holdings had to sell Stansted as a result of a ruling by the Competition Commission.

The sale is due to be completed next month

Heathrow Airport Holdings chief executive Colin Matthews said: “Stansted Airport and its people have been part of our company for a long time.

“We wish the new owners every success and are confident the airport will continue to flourish. We will continue to focus on improving Heathrow, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Southampton airports.”

Manchester Airport is owned by Manchester Airports Group, which is a holding company in turn owned by the 10 borough councils of Greater Manchester.

Heathrow Airport Holdings is owned by an international consortium led by Spanish infrastructure group Ferrovial.

The Competition Commission ruled in 2009 that the then BAA had to sell both Stansted and Gatwick due to concerns over a lack of competition between London’s three main airports, which, led by Heathrow, were all owned by the same company.

Read the rest of this story at BBC News…..

 


BBC News
19th Jan, 2012



[Daily Mail] Budget airline Ryanair has been ordered to ‘review’ the amount of fuel it carries after three of its planes – including one from the UK –  were forced to make ‘Mayday’ emergency landings in Spain when  they started to run out .

Ryanair was operating with a level of fuel that was 'close to the minimum' required in the case of a diversion

Ryanair was operating with a level of fuel that was ‘close to the minimum’ required in the case of a diversion. Photo: Wikipedia

The airline was operating with a level of fuel that was ‘close to the minimum’ required in the case of a diversion, they said.

Three Ryanair Boeing 737-800 aircraft heading to Madrid were forced to make emergency landings after being diverted to Valencia because of thunderstorms over the Spanish capital.

One of the three affected  planes was heading from Stansted Airport to Madrid when the diversions and emergency landings occurred at Valencia on July 26 this year.

The Irish Aviation Authority Report noted: ‘All three aircraft declared an Emergency (Mayday) when the calculated useable fuel on landing at Valencia was less than the final reserve.’

The watchdogs accept that  all three Ryanair planes left for Madrid ‘with fuel in excess of Flight plan requirements’  and also with fuel ‘in excess of the minimum diversion fuel’ required, so remained strictly  within the rules.

However, the IAA also noted: ‘Diverting with fuel  close to the minimum diversion fuel in the circumstances presented on the evening in question was likely to present challenges for the crew.’

It has also questioned whether the current fuel limit rules give passenger jets enough latitude  land safely in the event of a diversion from Madrid – and asked Spanish aviation chiefs to look at them again.

Spanish pilot union leaders have accused Ryanair of…..

Read the full story at Mail Online…..


Mail Online
21st Sept, 2012



[Metro] A recent poll from travel search site Skyscanner claims Luton was rated as the most unfriendly airport with only 5.76 points out of ten.

Luton has been named the UK's most unfriendly airport in a new survey.

Luton has been named the UK’s most unfriendly airport in a new survey. Photo: Wikipedia

London airports Stansted, Heathrow and Gatwick also featured towards the bottom of the list.

Meanwhile, the one airport which is getting things right is Edinburgh, earning a massive thumbs up from visitors.

ith a score of 7.41 points out of ten for friendliness it was followed closely by Newcastle (7.34) and then Manchester (6.87). Around Europe, Paris was voted the rudest airport with a score of just 4.86 points, while Moscow received 5.03 points and Istanbul was awarded 5.91 points.

The friendliest European airport, according to travellers, was shown to be Copenhagen (7.08 points).

Commenting on the results, Victoria Bailie from Skyscanner said: ‘We like to have a good moan and grumble but overall, the average scores were positives for the UK’s airports.

‘Despite the summer rush, they’ve clearly been doing a good job to help kick start our holiday on a positive note.’

Read the original story at Metro…..

 


Metro.co.uk
21st Aug, 2012