Archive for the ‘USA’ Category


[Airport Informer] There are no words that we can add to report on this outrage today, other than to say that our thoughts remain with all of those directly and indirectly affected this morning. 

Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy

    Our thoughts are with all of those affected by this tradegy.

 


Airport Informer
22nd March, 2016


 

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[BBC News] United Continental is facing a challenge from two shareholders calling for changes to the airline’s board.

Altimeter and PAR said the airline has done little to improve performance

Altimeter and PAR said the airline has done little to improve performance

Altimeter and PAR said they would put forward six new board members for election at United’s annual meeting.

They blamed an “entrenched board” on the airline’s failure to make progress.

But United’s chairman Henry Meyer said the shareholders had ignored attempts the board had made to engage them.

Together Altimeter and PAR control 7.1% of United’s shares.

The investors object to United’s decision, on Monday, to expand the size of its board with three new members.

“Yesterday’s last-ditch effort – adding just three people to its now 15-person board – is a cynical attempt to preserve power by this entrenched board,” said Brad Gerstner chief executive of Altimeter.

United announced its chief executive officer Oscar Munoz will return to full time work on 14 March after recovering from a heart attack in October.

Read the full story here at BBC News……

 


BBC News
9th March, 2016



[Daily Mail] The first ever Boeing 727, first revealed to the public in 1962, is set to fly again after sitting in a museum for the last 25 years.

A team of volunteers with a keen interest in aviation, and the skills to make a difference, have spent weeks restoring the United Airlines jetliner to its former glory.

A tentative date of March 1 has been pencilled in when the aircraft will rise from the tarmac once more

A tentative date of March 1 has been penciled in when the aircraft will rise from the tarmac once more

The plane was donated by United Airlines back in 1991 to the Museum of Flight’s Restoration Center at Paine Field, where it has been sat ever since.

The restoration of the iconic jet has been documented by aviation enthusiast and keen photographer Robert Bogash on his blog.

‘We are waking up an airplane that first flew 53 years ago, and that has been “sleeping” for the past 25 years,’ writes Mr Bogash.

‘But – especially for me – I began my affair with her 32 years ago – she is still an airplane that has the magic of flight embedded in her genes, and we intend to let her experience that magic one more time. And we will savour the…….

Read the full story at the MailOnline…..

 


MailOnline
Friday 26th February, 2016>



[NBCCHICARGO.COM] A cyber security expert tells NBC5 Investigates he has found a way to hack into the satellite communications systems used in multiple industries.

“These devices are wide open right now,” said Ruben Santamarta, a security consultant based in Madrid, Spain with IOActive.

"For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels," said Santamarta

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. Image: nbcchicargo.com

Pilots, ship captains and military personnel rely on satellite networks to communicate when there are no phone lines or wireless networks available.

“If someone can see the password or that user name it’s over,” he added. “Those vulnerabilities can be exploited to remotely compromise those devices.

Santamarta said he used something called reverse engineering — or decoding — to hack satellite communications equipment used in aerospace, maritime and military industries.

“In the military sector they use satellite terminals for combat units,” said Santamarta. “They normally encrypt the radio [transmissions] they send. But we can disrupt the satellite communications channel so we can prevent combat units [from asking] for help if they are being attacked.”

And in the maritime sector, satellite communications are used to send and receive vital information that affects the safety of the crew.

“If they are being attacked by terrorists, or they are suffering fire, they can send a distress call,” he said. “But we found we can modify the firmware in some of those terminals, so we can prevent a crew from sending a distress call.”

Santamarta recently published a 25-page report and went public with his findings at Defcon 22 – the largest hacking conference in the world – held earlier this month in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“For the aerospace sector we can disrupt satellite communications, [and] potentially modify the data that goes through those channels,” said Santamarta. “In some cases you need physical access to compromise the devices we analyzed, but in other cases you can use Wi-Fi or the entertainment network to access that device.”

His research took place in a lab setting and has not been tested on an actual commercial plane. But his findings have raised concerns in the aviation industry.

Read the full story at NBCCHICARGO.OM here….

 


NBCCHICARGO.COM
21st August, 2014


 

 

 


[Government Security News] The FBI Cyber Division has warned that the Aviation industry is under continual cyber-attack. Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) actors have been sending successful spear-phishing e-mails targeting the aviation community.

The FBI assesses that APT actors target technology, best practices, and other proprietary information from victim businesses for theft.

GCR has appointed Andre Allen as its new information & cyber security manager; Allen will spearhead GCR’s Cyber Security Practice to deliver cost-effective cyber security solutions with a primary focus on the aviation industry, the company says.

Allen will lead an experienced team of certified project managers and developers, some with high level government security clearance.

Andre Allen

Andre Allen

GCR provides cyber security solutions to the aviation industry partly due to the experience the company has in providing technology solutions to large airports.

The Cyber Security Practice will leverage GCR’s security architecture, policies, technologies and processes to produce automated cyber security solutions.

GCR is currently implementing automated cyber security solutions at a major U.S. airport.

“GCR leveraged the existing partnership with the airport to collaboratively deliver cyber security solutions that address the needs and challenges faced in the aviation industry,” said Tim Walsh, director of Aviation Services for GCR.

“We are excited about having Andre on our team as he brings a wealth of information and cyber security knowledge, specifically having been an IT security leader at the NASA Johnson Space Center for the past 15 years.”


Government Security News
5th Aug, 2014



[World Bulletin] Cybersecurity researcher Ruben Santamarta says he has figured out how to hack the satellite communications equipment on passenger jets through their WiFi and in-flight entertainment systems – a claim that, if confirmed, could prompt a review of aircraft security.

“In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications”

Santamarta, a consultant with cybersecurity firm IOActive, is scheduled to lay out the technical details of his research at this week’s Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas, an annual convention where thousands of hackers and security experts meet to discuss emerging cyber threats and improve security measures.

His presentation on Thursday on vulnerabilities in satellite communications systems used in aerospace and other industries is expected to be one of the most widely watched at the conference. “These devices are wide open.

The goal of this talk is to help change that situation,” Santamarta, 32, told Reuters. The researcher said he discovered the vulnerabilities by “reverse engineering” – or decoding – highly specialized software known as firmware, used to operate communications equipment made by Cobham Plc, Harris Corp, EchoStar Corp’s Hughes Network Systems, Iridium Communications Inc and Japan Radio Co Ltd.

 

In theory, a hacker could use a plane’s onboard WiFi signal or inflight entertainment system to hack into its avionics equipment, potentially disrupting or modifying satellite communications, which could interfere with the aircraft’s navigation and safety systems, Santamarta said.

He acknowledged that his hacks have only been tested in controlled environments, such as IOActive’s Madrid laboratory, and they might be difficult to replicate in the real world.

Santamarta said he decided to go public to encourage manufacturers to fix what he saw as risky security flaws. Representatives for Cobham, Harris, Hughes and Iridium said they had reviewed Santamarta’s research and confirmed some of his findings, but downplayed the risks.

For instance, Cobham, whose Aviation 700 aircraft satellite communications equipment was the focus of Santamarta’s research, said it is not possible for hackers to use WiFi signals to interfere with critical systems that rely on satellite communications for navigation and safety.

The hackers must have physical access to Cobham’s equipment, according to Cobham spokesman Greg Caires. “In the aviation and maritime markets we serve, there are strict requirements restricting such access to authorized personnel only,” said Caires. A Japan Radio Co spokesman declined to comment, saying information on such vulnerabilities was not public.

Read the full story here…… 

 


World Bulletin 4th Aug, 2014



[BBC News] A pilot in the US ordered and paid for pizzas for a plane full of passengers after they were held on the tarmac in Wyoming.

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Gerhard Bradner ordered 50 half cheese and half pepperoni pizzas for the passengers – who waited for two hours waiting for bad weather to clear in Denver.

Mr Bradner told Phil Williams on BBC Radio 5live that he had since been called by the airline’s president who has promised to reimburse him for the cost.

Read the full story here…..

 


BBC News
9th July, 2014


 


[airportcybersecurity.com] ServiceTec is delighted to announce the launch of a new website for its cyber security division, Airport CyberSec. 

AirportCyberSecurity

Airport CyberSec offers airports all over the world a full range of Cyber Security services designed to keep their staff, passengers and data safe.

Airport CyberSec’s cyber security experts work alongside airport IT and security teams to help protect against all aspects of cyber-attack.

Aside from an overview of the services offered by Airport CyberSec, the site will feature expert opinion and insight on the latest developments in the field of cyber security from the team, including Dr. John McCarthy, a world renowned authority on cyber-security strategy, development and Airport CyberSec services include:

Social Engineering Training, to protect against the practice of manipulating people into subverting security procedures or divulging confidential information

CyberIMMUNE, a unique software that mitigates the threat of malware by disabling its ability to write to disk and therefore preventing it from delivering its payload. This unique and powerful tool offers greater protection than any alternative against a zero-day attack – a threat that exploits a previously unknown vulnerability, i.e. one that is so new that the airports IT security team have had no time to address it.

Network & Web-site Security – the integrity of an airport’s network, intranet and website as well as its data security policies will quite obviously have a major influence on that airport’s vulnerability to cyber-attack. Airport CyberSec offers network security audits to test the integrity of an airport’s entire IT infrastructure.

Cyber Security Policies – Airport Cybersec can  offer assistance in the preparation and reviewing of cybersecurity policies based on world-wide best practice.

Monitoring Compliance with CyberSAFE – once best practice cyber-security policies are established staff may know what they should do, however it is also necessary to ensure staff are compliant with the policy on a day to day basis. CyberSAFE assists with both monitoring and enforcement.

 

The website can be found at www.airportcybersecurity.com

 

 


ABOUT SERVICETEC

ServiceTec specialises exclusively in the provision of Managed IT Services to the world’s airport and ,airline industries, and has been doing so since 1989. ServiceTec operates globally, with headquarters in the UK and the USA, and offices in Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and Japan.

Airports served include JFK, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Nashville, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Berlin,

Please visit http://www.servicetec.com


Servicetec Airport Services
Letchworth, UK – 27th March 2014


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[ITV NewsThomson Airways said a Dreamliner flying to Florida returned to Manchester after a “technical issue”.

Thomson Airways says Dreamliner forced to return to UK

Thomson Airways says Dreamliner forced to return to UK

A spokeswoman said: “Thomson Airways can confirm that flight TOM126 travelling from Manchester to Sanford, Florida experienced a technical issue and the aircraft returned to Manchester Airport, as a precautionary measure.

“Passengers have disembarked and our dedicated team of engineers are now inspecting the aircraft. Our customers will be moved to an alternative aircraft to ensure they get away on their holiday as soon as possible.

“The safety of our customers and crew is of paramount importance and we would like to apologise for the delay caused.”

Read the original story at ITV News…..


ITV News
12th July, 2012



[BBC News] Runways at London’s Heathrow airport have closed after a fire on a parked Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner jet.

No passengers were on board at the time of the fire

No passengers were on board at the time of the fire.  Image: BBC News

Arrivals and departures were suspended after the incident at 16:30 BST, a spokesman for the airport said. No passengers were aboard at the time.

Fifty Dreamliners worldwide were grounded in January because of battery malfunctions.

BBC Video Here

Aerial pictures show damage to the planes structure under the tail fin.   Image: BBC News

Aerial pictures show damage to the planes structure under the tail fin. Image: BBC News

Boeing later modified the jets with new batteries and flight resumed in April.

An Ethiopian Airlines Dreamliner named the Queen of Sheba – the same plane involved in the Heathrow incident – flew from Addis Ababa to Nairobi on the first commercial flight since the grounding.

Pictures of the Heathrow fire on Twitter show an aircraft close to a building and surrounded by fire vehicles. London Fire Brigade said its crews were standing by to assist Heathrow staff.

Fire-retardant foam appeared to have been sprayed at the airliner, but no damage to the aircraft was immediately apparent.

A Heathrow spokesman said: “We can confirm there has been an on-board internal fire involving an Ethiopian Airlines aircraft and the airport’s emergency services are in attendance.

“The aircraft was parked on a remote parking stand. There were no passengers on board and there are no reported injuries at this time.

“Arrivals and departures are temporarily suspended while airport fire crews attend to this incident. This is a standard procedure if fire crews are occupied with an incident.”

The airport is advising passengers to check the status of their flights with the airlines.

The Metropolitan Police said: “Police at Heathrow were alerted to a fire on a plane. Emergency services are in attendance.

“At this time it is believed no one was on board and there are no reports of any injuries. The fire is being treated as unexplained.”

Read the original story at BBC News……


BBC News
12 July, 2013