Posts Tagged ‘Airbus A320 family’


[BBC News] An unidentified drone came close to hitting a plane as it landed at Heathrow, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has confirmed.

An Airbus A320 pilot reported seeing a helicopter-style drone as the jet was 700 feet off the ground on its approach to the runway at 1416 GMT on 22 July.

The CAA has not identified the airline or how close the drone came to the plane, which can carry 180 people.

It gave the incident an “A” rating, meaning a “serious risk of collision”.

This is the highest incident rating the CAA can give.

Investigators were unable to identify the drone, which did not appear on air traffic control radar and disappeared after the encounter.

In May the pilot of an ATR 72 turbo-prop plane reported seeing a helicopter drone only 80 feet away as he approached Southend airport at a height of 1,500 feet.

The incidents have prompted a warning from the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) that the rapid increase in the number of drones operated by amateur enthusiasts now poses “a real risk” to commercial aircraft.

The association’s general secretary, Jim McAuslan said drones could cause a repeat of the “Hudson River experience”, when a plane was forced to land in water in New York in 2009 after birds were sucked into its engines.

“The risk of a 10 kilogram object hitting a plane is a real one that pilots are very concerned about” he said.

“A small drone could be a risky distraction for a pilot coming into land and cause serious damage if they hit one.”

Sales of drones have increased rapidly, with UK sales running at a rate of between 1,000 and 2,000 every month.

They are expected to be very popular as Christmas presents.

They cost as little as £35 for a smaller model – more advanced drones capable of carrying a high definition camera and travelling at 45 miles per hour cost almost £3,000.

Only a very small minority of people operating drones have attended training courses in how to fly them.

A spokesman for the CAA said it had to depend on people using their common sense when they operated drones.

He said the current level of risk should be “kept in perspective” but warned that breaking laws governing the use of drones could potentially threaten commercial aircraft.

“People using unmanned aircraft need to think, use common sense and take responsibility for them”, he said.

“There are rules which have the force of law and have to be followed.”

Drones may not be flown higher than 400 feet or further than 500 metres from the operator, and they must not go within 50 metres of people, vehicles or buildings.

There are exclusion zones around airports and the approaches to them for drones weighing more than seven kilograms.

Mr McAuslan said there was an urgent need for rules to be tightened before much larger unmanned cargo planes – potentially the size of a Boeing 737 – took to the skies.

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC News
7th December, 2014


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[BBC News] The doors on both engines of the flight that made an emergency landing at Heathrow last week had been left unlatched, investigators have found.

Footage filmed from on board the plane shows the emergency landing

Footage filmed from on board the plane shows the emergency landing: Video courtesy BBC News

Air accident experts said the coverings – the fan cowl doors – broke off and punctured the right engine’s fuel pipe, damaging the aircraft’s systems.

A fire then broke out in the right engine of the Airbus A319 British Airways flight to Oslo.

The jet landed safely and its 75 passengers and crew were evacuated.

The aeroplane returned to Heathrow soon after taking off last Friday when black smoke was seen coming from an engine.

The findings were made in an interim report by the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB), which is examining the cause of the emergency.

‘Appropriate initial action’

The fire in the right engine broke out as the flight prepared to land, but the left engine was unaffected, the AAIB report said.

“Subsequent investigation revealed that the fan cowl doors on both engines were left unlatched during maintenance and this was not identified prior to aircraft departure,” the report added.

Keith Williams, BA chief executive, said: “We continue to co-operate fully with the investigation team and can confirm that appropriate initial action has already been taken in accordance with the AAIB’s safety recommendation to Airbus.”

Mr Williams added that he could not discuss any details while the inquiry continued.

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin said the report contained “serious findings”, adding that the aviation industry “must act immediately to take the appropriate safety action and ensure that all lessons are learnt from what has happened”.

BBC transport correspondent Richard Westcott said British Airways had confirmed that two different engineers would normally check whether a plane’s engine covers had been shut before take-off.

“One checks, the other double-checks – that’s clearly not happened in this case,” he said.

Mr Westcott added that BA’s mechanics were all staff of the airline, which would not say if anyone had been suspended.

‘Slight bump’

The aircraft underwent normal overnight maintenance which included opening the cowl doors and checking the oil levels, the report said.

Nothing unusual was noted during the checks before the flight took off, but the cowl doors would have been “difficult to see unless crouched down so that the bottom of the engine is clearly visible”.

As the plane took off the 50-year-old pilot reported feeling a “slight bump” and thought the aircraft had run over a light on the runway.

David Learmount, former pilot: “This is a bit of an accident waiting to happen because it is so difficult to see”

Air traffic controllers alerted the pilot about the flight leaving some debris on the runway, which later turned out to be the detached cowl doors.

When the crew realised the doors had broken off, causing a “significant fuel leak” and affecting the hydraulic system, the pilot decided to return to the airport.

The cowl doors also damaged the tyres, landing gears and the hydraulic brake pipe.

The right engine was “extensively damaged” in the fire, the report said.

Last July Airbus said there had been 32 reported……

Read the rest of this story at BBC News…..

 


BBC News
31st May, 2013


 

 


[Vienna] Yesterday we reported from Austria on the freak accident that involved an Airbus A321 at Vienna International Airport. The aircraft had its front left main door ripped away from the fuselage when the attached Jetway suddenly lifted about 1.5 meters up, entangled with and ripping off the aircraft door.

Click on the images for a full size photo: Photo’s courtesy of The Aviation Herald

Click on the images for a full size photo: Photo’s courtesy of The Aviation Herald

This evening The Aviation Herald has published large images of the incident, taken immediatlely after the event. Click on either of the images for the full size photos at The Aviation Herald.

Click on the images for a full size photo: Photo’s courtesy of The Aviation Herald

Click on the images for a full size photo: Photo’s courtesy of The Aviation Herald

Original Story

The flight (HG-2715) from Malaga in Spain landed at Vienna International Airport and made its way to Gate C41, when it stopped at the gate ready for the passengers to disembark, the ground crew manoeuvred and docked the Jetway on to the aircraft.

When the crew opened the main door and passengers were about to leave the aircraft, the Jetway suddenly lifted about 5 feet up, entangled with the aircraft door and then lifted the entire aircraft by about 8 inches upwards.

At this point the aircraft door was ripped from the fuselage causing the aircraft to fall back onto the apron.

The passengers and crew were forced to leave the aircraft via the rear door and were then taken into an enclosed area of the terminal building and were asked if anyone had suffered any injuries from the incident. The travelers all confirmed that there were no ill effects at the time.

The aircraft received substantial damage and has been out of service since the incident on Sunday.

A spokesman from flyNiki confirmed that the Airbus had been lifted when the Jetway moved upwards and became entangled in the front door, and then fell down to the apron when the door sheared off.

A spokesman for Vienna International Airport said that, “Medical assistance was offered to all passengers following an aircraft being lifted by the Jetway, however no passenger reported any pain or injuries at the time”

The Jetway had correctly docked against the aircraft, but a failure of a sensor unit caused the Jetway to suddenly lift taking the aircraft door and aircraft with it.

Today (May 8th) a female passenger aged 76, reported feeling pain and was seen by doctors who diagnosed her with the fracture to her coccyx.

Investigations are expected to continue.

Read the original report at The Aviation Herald…..


The Aviation Herald
8th May, 2012

Lat updated 9th May, 2012



Latest Update With Pictures Here

[The Aviation Herald] Vienna – On Sunday an Airbus A321 had its front left main door ripped away from the fuselage in a freak accident. The ‘flyNiki‘ aircraft had just arrived from Spain when the incident happened.

The jetway suddenly lifted about 1.5 meters up, entangled with the aircraft door

The Jetway suddenly lifted about 1.5 meters up, entangled with the aircraft door. Photo: Wikipedia

The flight (HG-2715) from Malaga in Spain landed at Vienna International Airport and made its way to Gate C41, when it stopped at the gate ready for the passengers to disembark, the ground crew manoeuvred and docked the Jetway on to the aircraft.

When the crew opened the main door and passengers were about to leave the aircraft, the Jetway suddenly lifted about 5 feet up, entangled with the aircraft door and then lifted the entire aircraft by about 8 inches upwards.

At this point the aircraft door was ripped from the fuselage causing the aircraft to fall back onto the apron.

The passengers and crew were forced to leave the aircraft via the rear door and were then taken into an enclosed area of the terminal building and were asked if anyone had suffered any injuries from the incident. The travelers all confirmed that there were no ill effects at the time.

The aircraft received substantial damage and has been out of service since the incident on Sunday.

A spokesman from flyNiki confirmed that the Airbus had been lifted when the Jetway moved upwards and became entangled in the front door, and then fell down to the apron when the door sheared off.

A spokesman for Vienna International Airport said that, “Medical assistance was offered to all passengers following an aircraft being lifted by the Jetway, however no passenger reported any pain or injuries at the time”

The Jetway had correctly docked against the aircraft, but a failure of a sensor unit caused the Jetway to suddenly lift taking the aircraft door and aircraft with it.

Today (May 8th)  a female passenger aged 76 reported feeling felt pain and was seen by doctors who diagnosed her with the fracture to her coccyx.

Investigations are expected to continue.

Read the original report at The Aviation Herald…..


The Aviation Herald
8th May, 2012