Posts Tagged ‘Civil Aviation Authority’


[The Guardian] Price comparison study finds the likes of Ryanair and easyJet charging more than triple the supermarket price for popular food and drink brands.

 Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy Ryanair was found to have the most expensive in-flight refreshments. Photograph: Alamy

Low cost airlines are hiking up the price of snacks and drinks by more than 1,000% compared with everyday prices, according to research that shows that a 12p cup-a-soup sachet can cost passengers as much as £2.50.

A comparison of six major budget airlines serving the UK market found huge price increases on basic refreshments, with most carriers charging £2.60 for a tea and £1.80 for a 500ml bottle of water.

Ryanair, perceived by most as the airline offering the lowest seat prices, was found to be the most expensive when it came to on-board snacks, charging £2.34 for a bottle of water and £1.56 for a chocolate bar.

Passengers on a Ryanair flight could find themselves paying £1.96 for a 200ml can of cola, and £2.34 for a 160g bag of gummy sweets.

However, Ryanair is by no means alone in……

Read more at the The Guardian……….

 


The Guardian
Friday 126th February, 2016


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[BBC News] An unidentified drone came close to hitting a plane as it landed at Heathrow, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has confirmed.

An Airbus A320 pilot reported seeing a helicopter-style drone as the jet was 700 feet off the ground on its approach to the runway at 1416 GMT on 22 July.

The CAA has not identified the airline or how close the drone came to the plane, which can carry 180 people.

It gave the incident an “A” rating, meaning a “serious risk of collision”.

This is the highest incident rating the CAA can give.

Investigators were unable to identify the drone, which did not appear on air traffic control radar and disappeared after the encounter.

In May the pilot of an ATR 72 turbo-prop plane reported seeing a helicopter drone only 80 feet away as he approached Southend airport at a height of 1,500 feet.

The incidents have prompted a warning from the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) that the rapid increase in the number of drones operated by amateur enthusiasts now poses “a real risk” to commercial aircraft.

The association’s general secretary, Jim McAuslan said drones could cause a repeat of the “Hudson River experience”, when a plane was forced to land in water in New York in 2009 after birds were sucked into its engines.

“The risk of a 10 kilogram object hitting a plane is a real one that pilots are very concerned about” he said.

“A small drone could be a risky distraction for a pilot coming into land and cause serious damage if they hit one.”

Sales of drones have increased rapidly, with UK sales running at a rate of between 1,000 and 2,000 every month.

They are expected to be very popular as Christmas presents.

They cost as little as £35 for a smaller model – more advanced drones capable of carrying a high definition camera and travelling at 45 miles per hour cost almost £3,000.

Only a very small minority of people operating drones have attended training courses in how to fly them.

A spokesman for the CAA said it had to depend on people using their common sense when they operated drones.

He said the current level of risk should be “kept in perspective” but warned that breaking laws governing the use of drones could potentially threaten commercial aircraft.

“People using unmanned aircraft need to think, use common sense and take responsibility for them”, he said.

“There are rules which have the force of law and have to be followed.”

Drones may not be flown higher than 400 feet or further than 500 metres from the operator, and they must not go within 50 metres of people, vehicles or buildings.

There are exclusion zones around airports and the approaches to them for drones weighing more than seven kilograms.

Mr McAuslan said there was an urgent need for rules to be tightened before much larger unmanned cargo planes – potentially the size of a Boeing 737 – took to the skies.

Read the original story at BBC News…..


BBC News
7th December, 2014



[Reuters] London’s Heathrow said on Tuesday it would not appeal a decision by the regulator to impose a cap on the prices Britain’s biggest airport can charge airlines, adding it did not believe other parties would appeal the ruling either.

“We are focussed on delivering our business plan for the period from 2014-18 and further improving Heathrow for passengers,” the airport said in a brief statement.

Heathrow had warned in January that it could struggle to grow its business after the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) ruled it must set its prices at 1.5 percent below inflation from April 2014 after finding that the airport – Europe’s busiest – had too much market power.

Read the original story at Reuters…..

 


(Reporting by Kate Holton, Editing by Paul Sandle)
Reuters
1st April, 2014


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[BBC NewsRyanair has announced record profits this week, and the purchase of 175 new Boeing airliners. It’s evidently one of Europe’s most successful airlines at present – but has it even so been blowing its own trumpet a bit too much?

Ryanair prides itself on turning around flights quickly.

Ryanair prides itself on turning around flights quickly. Photo Wikipedia

Ever heard the cheerful jingle on a Ryanair plane as it touches down on the runway?

“Last year over 90% of Ryanair flights landed on time, beating every other European airline.”

Quite a boast. According to the statistics that Ryanair puts out itself, they achieved 90% punctuality last year, and have done for the last few years.

But we only have their word for it. There is scant data available to the public on airline punctuality.

The UK’s Civil Aviation Authority does collect data on flights arriving and departing from 10 UK airports. It defines “on time” as being within 15 minutes of its stated arrival time.

A website called flightontime.info crunched that data and worked out that Ryanair fell short of 90%, achieving only 83% at these 10 airports.

Taking the figures for 2012, bmi regional was the most punctual. Eleven other airlines also beat Ryanair’s 83% punctuality record.

Ryanair’s overall punctuality score – taking into account its flights landing at or taking off from other airports around Europe – could easily be higher than 83%, says Jim Paton, senior lecturer in the Department of Air Transport at Cranfield University.

“A big proportion of their network in Europe is operations to small airports that don’t suffer from air traffic congestion, as would be the case around London and Paris,” he says. This makes it easier to avoid delays.

He adds that Ryanair flies to airports where the facilities are relatively close to the runway, so the plane doesn’t spend several minutes taxiing, as it would often have to at airports such as Schiphol in Amsterdam.

The airline says: “Ryanair’s published monthly punctuality is calculated as the percentage of all (approx 42,000 on average) Ryanair flights in any month, at all 180 airports, which land ahead of, on, or within 15 minutes of scheduled arrival time.”

Punctuality statistics published by third parties are unreliable because their data is based on estimates or incomplete samples, which exclude certain airports, flights or airlines, the company adds.

But the Ryanair jingle also says it is “beating every other European airline” on punctuality. Where does this idea come from?

Ryanair says it is comparing its own punctuality figures with “the most recent Association of European Airlines published statistics”.

However, that organisation has not published any new figures since 2009.

In addition, it has only 32 members. Although those members include many big airlines, more than 200 airlines in Europe are not members – including Ryanair.

So there is no public data that proves this claim. And even if there were, it might be hard to take at face value because of a phenomenon known as “schedule padding”.

This is when airlines (or other transport companies) stretch their published journey times in order to…..

Read the rest of this feature at BBC News…..


Charlotte McDonald
BBC News
26th May, 2013



The U.K.’s Stansted airport could double the number of handled passengers to 36 million if it was exempt from Civil Aviation Authority regulation, the Times reported, citing Nick Barton, the airport’s managing director.

The number of passengers passing through Stansted fell 25 percent between 2007 and 2011, according to the Times.

The number of passengers passing through Stansted fell 25 percent between 2007 and 2011, according to the Times.

Managing that many passengers would help alleviate congestion at Heathrow and Gatwick airports, according to Stansted. “Stansted should be competing on a level playing field,” Barton said in the report.

Nick Barton, the airport’s managing director.states "Stansted airport could double the number of handled passengers to 36 million if it was exempt from Civil Aviation Authority regulation"

Nick Barton, the airport’s managing director.states "Stansted airport could double the number of handled passengers to 36 million if it was exempt from Civil Aviation Authority regulation"

The number of passengers passing through Stansted fell 25 percent between 2007 and 2011, according to the Times.

Read the Bloomberg report….


Reporter: Agnieszka Troszkiewicz in London at atroszkiewic@bloomberg.net
editor: Claudia Carpenter at ccarpenter2@bloomberg.net