Posts Tagged ‘Shanghai’


[Stuff.co.nz] Despite increased security travel measures around the world, one woman managed to board the wrong plane, with the wrong airline – all under the wrong name.

Despite the fact that she was travelling under a different name, on passenger was able to board a Cathay Pacific plane.

According to The South China Morning Post, the incident happened at Taiwan Airport when a woman, known as “Ms Hong” was flying to Hong Kong.

The first error in the series of incredible events happened when she checked into the Cathay Pacific desk – instead of Hong Kong Airlines.

Despite checking in with the wrong carrier, Hong was processed. She was also holding a boarding pass that belonged to a man with the same surname, also flying to Hong Kong.

The flights had been booked by Hong’s boyfriend who was told his partner had not boarded her Hong Kong Airlines flight.

SCMP reports that the woman was furious.

“The name on the air ticket wasn’t me. Even the sex on the air ticket was not right. This is ridiculous,” she said.

Cathay Pacific and Hong Kong Airlines have since come together to ensure Hong made a safe return trip, she was also given the use of Cathay’s executive lounge.

A spokesperson for Cathay Pacific confirmed there had been an ……

Read the full story at Stuff.co.nz….


Stuff.co.nz
27th February, 2016


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Shanghai Airport: An Etihad Airways aircraft that landed at 11:28am from the United Arab Emirates was heading for the terminal and had to stop because of a group of more than 20 angry passengers.

Angry passengers stop Etihad plane in Shanghai

Angry passengers stop Etihad plane in Shanghai

The passengers refused to board an plane at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai then took their protest onto the taxiway to demand compensation for their delayed flight, airport and airline officials said.

Shanghai airport authority said that airport officials quickly managed to persuade the passengers to leave the taxiway and took them back to the terminal. The whole process lasted about five minutes and the incident didn’t otherwise affect flights at the airport.

The airport said the passengers, who are now under investigation, were among 161 people whose flight from Shenzhen, in southern China’s Guangdong Province,  to Nanjing was delayed by poor weather on Tuesday evening.

The Shenzhen Airlines’ Flight ZH9817 had been scheduled to land in the eastern city of Nanjing at 6:50pm and then fly on to Harbin in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang Province at 10pm, said Li Weiqi, an airline spokeswoman. But on the way to Nanjing, the Airbus 320 encountered a thunderstorm and had to land at the Pudong airport at around 8pm.

The airline put the passengers up at a nearby hotel and agreed to arrange other flights the next day to take them to Nanjing or Harbin when the weather cleared, Li said.

“The airline officials have done all that they should do when encountering bad weather,” she said.

Most passengers took another flight to Harbin, while the remaining 40 were due to leave for Nanjing at 11am yesterday, but more than 20 of them refused to board the plane and demanded the company compensate them for the delay, according to the airport. “Since no one was coming up to solve our problem, we decided to rush to the runway,” a man who said he was one of the passengers wrote on his microblog.

He uploaded pictures showing the passengers, carrying their luggage, walking on the taxiway. There were a number of online replies to his post urging the passengers to get back to the terminal, but he responded:

“No way, we are going toward the airplane.” Then he wrote: “Seems like an international airplane has to suffer. We stopped it from moving.”

The passengers’ behavior stirred public anger online with accusations that by acting selfishly the group had put other passengers’ lives in danger. “Trying to block other airplanes just to get some compensation for flight delayed by poor weather?

Shenzhen Airlines later agreed to pay compensation of 1,000 yuan (US$158.5) to each of the passengers on the delayed flight. But the protesters’ victory could be costly. The passengers who went onto the tarmac could be detained for five to 10 days with fines and might face criminal penalties of up to five years in prison under Chinese law, said Liu Chunquan, a senior lawyer with the Panocean Law Firm in Shanghai.

“The passengers should be punished because they have threatened the safety of hundreds of other passengers by rushing onto the runway,” Liu said. The airport should also take some responsibility because its staff failed to stop the passengers from leaving the terminal and entering the taxiway….

Read the full story at ShanghaiDaily.com….


ShanghaiDaily.com
By Xu Chi and Yang Jian | 2012-4-12



As part of plans to tap into the growing travel market, Air New Zealand has released plans to operate daily flights between China and New Zealand.

Air New Zealand has released plans to operate daily flights between China and New Zealand.

Air New Zealand has released plans to operate daily flights between China and New Zealand.

Commencing from 4 July this year, the airline revealed it would add a fifth weekly service to Shanghai, however, added that it would suspend its twice weekly service between Auckland and Beijing from 30 June this year.

The carrier’s international airline group general manager Christopher Luxon explained while the airline was still committed to the Beijing region, the suspended flights would open opportunity to focus on Shanghai services.

“We’re confident of the potential for long term growth from one of China’s most modern and populous cities,” Mr Luxon said.

“We’ve just appointed the first ever head of our Asia operations, Sandeep Bahl, who is a highly experienced airline executive in the region.

“Sandeep took up his new role in our Shanghai office at the beginning of the month.

“Under his guidance we will focus our marketing and sales resources on the Shanghai region of around 14 million people as we seek to provide customers a daily service to and from this important gateway in China.”

 

Full story at e-Travel Blackboard: N.J….