Posts Tagged ‘southwest airlines’


[USA Today]  Southwest Airlines plans to sell live television service on five planes and expand it to more aircraft by mid-July.

The airline plans to expand the service to 20 planes by mid-July

The airline plans to expand the service to 20 planes by mid-July. Photo: Wikipedia

 The airline said Thursday that it would offer seven sports and news channels for passengers to watch on their own devices.Southwest said it will test prices from $3 to $8 during a trial period. Passengers will need a Wi-Fi-enabled device such as a smartphone, tablet or laptop computer. Live TV will be offered separately from wireless Internet access and customers won’t have to buy Internet access to watch TV.

The Southwest channels will be: NBC Sports, MLB (Major League Baseball), NFL Network, CNBC, MSNBC, Fox News and Fox Business News.

Southwest hired Row 44 to provide the service, which the airline plans to expand to 20 planes by mid-July. Southwest said that if the service is successful, it will be added to all the airline’s Wi-Fi-enabled planes by the end of the year.

The airline has about 550 Boeing 737 jets including about 250 with Wi-Fi. It plans to outfit 70% of its fleet by the end of 2013.

Airlines have been expanding in-flight entertainment options such as Internet access to distinguish themselves from other airlines that often sell tickets for…..

Read the full story at USA Today Travel…..


The Associated Press
2nd July, 2012



[FT.com] Aditya Ghosh, the youthful president of IndiGo, says there is no big secret behind the success of India’s only profitable airline in an infamously difficult aviation market.

IndiGo President Aditya Ghosh says “We don’t try to do anything fancy, we don’t try to bend the wind, we just stick to our business model”

IndiGo President Aditya Ghosh says “We don’t try to do anything fancy, we don’t try to bend the wind, we just stick to our business model”. Photo: Wikipedia

When asked how the no-frills carrier manages to make money while its rivals bleed red ink thanks to extortionate taxes, high fuel prices and fierce price competition, Mr Ghosh simply says:

“We don’t try to do anything fancy, we don’t try to bend the wind, we just stick to our business model,” the 36-year-old executive says from his cramped office at company headquarters in the New Delhi suburb of Gurgaon. “We fly our planes on time; the flying experience is neat; and our fares are consistently lower than our competitors.”

Analysts tend to agree with his assessment. They say that in contrast to Kingfisher Airlines, the debt-laden carrier struggling to avoid bankruptcy, privately held IndiGo has followed the strategy of Southwest Airlines in the US and Europe’s Ryanair: offer only low-cost fares connecting busy destinations using just one type of plane.

“In terms of operations IndiGo is by far the best airline in India,” says Sharan Lillaney, aviation analyst at Angel Broking. “It’s definitely on track to become the Indian Southwest but it will have to prove itself over time.”

The president of the five-year-old carrier, owned by Rahul Bhatia, an Indian billionaire, and Rakesh Gangwal, the US Airways former chief executive, says…..

Read the full story at FT.com


By James Fontanella-Khan
New Delhi – 6th May 2012



[Daily Mail] The woman at the centre of a ‘too fat to fly’ controversy has announced that she is suing Southwest Airlines, who refused to allow her on a flight in April 2011.

Kenlie Tiggeman is suing Southwest Airlines after being told she was 'too fat to fly' for the second time in the space of six months in November 2011

Kenlie Tiggeman is suing Southwest Airlines after being told she was ‘too fat to fly’ for the second time in the space of six months in November 2011

New Orleans resident Kenlie Tiggeman is taking on the airlines controversial ‘Customers of Size’ policy which requires passengers to buy a second seat if they can’t fit between the 17-inch wide armrests.

In her quest to seek an injunction against the Dallas headquartered carrier, Tiggeman alleges that Southwest ignored her ‘constitutional rights’ and is involved in ‘discriminatory actions towards obese customers’

While she is not seeking monetary damages from the airline, Tiggeman has claimed that she wants to enact an industry wide standard for rules to be put in place clearly stating the official policy of all U.S air companies.

‘We need to know what the …….

Read the full story at The Daily Mail……


By Daily Mail Reporter
PUBLISHED: 06:16, 4 May 2012



[MACLEANS.CA] It is the country’s biggest and most dysfunctional airline, at war with its unions, losing money and protected by Ottawa. There may be only one way out.

The Air Canada back-to-work legislation only made a bad situation worse, fuelling more labour hostilities and chaos for passengers.

The Air Canada back-to-work legislation only made a bad situation worse, fuelling more labour hostilities and chaos for passengers: Photo Cole Garside

The Air Canada back-to-work legislation, passed March 14, was meant to spare Canadians from the nightmare, both personal and economic, of a crippling strike by ground workers and a lockout of pilots at the country’s biggest airline. So far, however, it’s only made a bad situation worse, fuelling more labour hostilities and chaos for passengers.

As they returned from March break, sun-seekers still faced long delays after an unusually large number of pilots called in sick. A few days later, dozens of flights were delayed or cancelled after angry baggage handlers in Toronto launched another wildcat strike—this time in apparent retaliation for Air Canada’s decision to discipline three workers who gave federal Labour Minister Lisa Raitt a mocking “slow clap” as she strolled through Pearson’s airy concourse.

More recently, television viewers were treated to the spectacle of pilots’ union president Paul Strachan on the CBC issuing veiled warnings about the potential for deteriorating safety standards at his employer. Wearing full uniform, he suggested the bankruptcy of Aveos Fleet Performance Inc., the airline’s former maintenance arm and major maintenance provider, could lead to future aircraft repairs being done at low-cost facilities in El Salvador, where employees can be paid as little as $16,000 a year. “My question to you is: Is this the man you want maintaining the aircraft that you fly on so frequently?” said Strachan. “I suspect not.”

Air Canada threatened to fire Strachan, calling him “irresponsible” and stressing it had no plans to service its jets in Central America (although it didn’t rule it out either). In response, a small group of pilots staged an illegal “sick-out” last week, causing the cancellation of more than 40 flights across the country and throwing the travel plans of thousands into disarray. “As a result of trying to legislate away uncertainty, they’ve done exactly the opposite,” George Smith, an adjunct professor in the school of policy studies at Queen’s University, says of Ottawa’s actions. “I’m sure that people looking at travelling for their summer vacations are now looking at the situation and saying, ‘ABAC—Anything But Air Canada.’ ”

That’s the last thing the money-losing airline needs as it grapples with lower-cost rivals while being dragged down by $3.9 billion in long-term debt. As the labour disputes mount, shares of the beleaguered airline have fallen nearly 20 per cent since February and now trade at just 87 cents, compared to an IPO price of $21 just six years ago…..

Read the full story at Macleans.ca….


Chris Sorensen
Monday, April 23, 201



Southwest Airlines and Amadeus IT Group announced today that they have entered into a joint contract for Amadeus’ Altea reservations solution that would support the carrier’s international service.

Southwest Airlines Co. will use a travel-reservations system from Amadeus IT Group to operate international flights in 2014.

Southwest Airlines Co. will use a travel-reservations system from Amadeus IT Group to operate international flights in 2014.: Photo Courtesy: Stu Seeger/Flickr/Creative Commons

Now that the contract is finalised, the two companies will work closely together to implement Amadeus’ technology to allow Southwest to operate international flights in 2014.

AirTran Airways, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Southwest Airlines, currently serves international destinations.  As the AirTran international flights transition to Southwest, Amadeus will support Southwest’s international flying.

While the Amadeus IT Group agreement focuses on the international element of Southwest’s reservation system, the contract also provides the option for Southwest to convert its domestic business to Amadeus in the future.

“We could not be more impressed with the experience and knowledge Amadeus IT Group brings to the table,” said Southwest Airlines Chairman, President, and CEO Gary Kelly. “They are a premier technology provider, and we are confident in their ability to meet and exceed our needs as we prepare for the exciting opportunity to extend the Southwest brand into the international marketplace.”

Luis Maroto, President & CEO, Amadeus commented: “This agreement is a  milestone for Amadeus, both in North America and beyond.  Indeed, not only is Southwest an industry leader in terms of its size, the airline is also the global ‘standard’ for low-cost carriers, celebrating 39 consecutive years of profits.”…..

Read the full story at BTN….


BTN Team
23rd April 2012



Southwest Airlines Co.’s first-quarter earnings soared amid positive hedging impacts and strong revenue growth.

Southwest had warned it would likely post a rare first-quarter loss

Southwest had warned it would likely post a rare first-quarter loss

Airlines have been cutting capacity to retain pricing power and flying fuller planes amid rising fuel costs. Southwest had warned it would likely post a rare first-quarter loss, which it did on an adjusted basis, weighed down by high fuel prices and wrinkles in integrating AirTran, which it acquired last year.

Passenger revenue per available seat mile, or Prasm, a key performance metric for the airline industry, rose 1.6% in the first quarter.

Traffic grew 23% from a year earlier while capacity rose 25%. Load factor, or the percentage of available seats filled, was 77.3% down from 78.3%.

Southwest reported earnings of $98 million, or 13 cents a share, up from $5 million, or a penny a share, a year earlier. Excluding acquisition and integration-related costs, hedging and fuel contract impacts and other items, the adjusted loss was two cents, compared with adjusted earnings of three cents.

Operating revenue jumped 29% to $4 billion, aided by the AirTran acquisition.

Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters had most recently forecast a loss of five cents on revenue of $4.01 billion.

Read the full story from The Wall Street Journal….


By TESS STYNES And MELODIE WARNER
April 19th 2012



Boeing’s 737 gets a makeover to add fuel efficiency.

The Boeing’s 737, a commercial jet that made its debut in 1968 and the one you’ve most likely flown on is getting a makeover to fit with the new demands of air travel in the 21st century.

Boeing 737 makeover to add fuel efficiency

Boeing 737 makeover to add fuel efficiency: USA Today Article

The new version, the 737 Max, which is scheduled to make its debut in 2017, is designed with new engines to burn less fuel than its three predecessors, to help airlines pare costs and leave less of a carbon footprint on the global environment.

But at its most basic, the Max will be the same 737 stalwart the traveling public has come to know the last 44 years. It’s a single-aisle jet that will ferry up to 215 passengers on both short and cross-country trips, and offer efficiency that’s helped make the 737 the best-selling commercial jet in history, with 9,745 sold.

“They’re known as the workhorse of the industry,” says Mike Van de Ven, COO of Southwest Airlines, which has exclusively flown 737s since the airline’s birth in 1971.

“It really beats the competition on fuel burn. It really beats the competition on reliability, and it really had a very effective maintenance program. And they just made that airplane better and better over the last 20 or 30 years.”

Southwest, which has the largest fleet of 737s in the world, with more than 550, is reaffirming its faith in Boeing and the 737 by ordering 150 Max jets. American Airlines is sold, too, having ordered 100 Max planes in July before seeking bankruptcy protection in November.

“There’s a lot of interest in our industry and among our customers in the next generation of aircraft,” says Virasb Vahidi, American’s chief commercial officer. “Customers see it as a better product and younger fleet, and airlines see it as an opportunity to lower our costs.”

A cheaper fuel bill could mean that rising airfares may not rise so quickly, say travel industry analysts.

“It hopefully will mean more stable pricing for consumers,” says Bryan Saltzburg, general manager of TripAdvisor flights. Lower costs for an airline, he says, “should transfer to the consumer pocketbook.”

Outfitted with new engines, the Max will use 10% to 12% less fuel than its most current Boeing peer, the Next-Generation 737, company officials say. That holds particular appeal for airlines, with jet fuel making up 25% to 40% of their costs, and whose profitability is threatened as the price of crude oil stays around $103 a barrel as it was on Friday…..

Read the full story at USA Today…..


By Charisse Jones
USA TODAY



The severe weather affected flights and aircraft at area airports.

The severe weather affected flights and aircraft at area airports.

The severe weather affected flights and aircraft at area airports.

More than 110 aircraft at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport sustained various degrees of hail damage, the airport said. It reported airlines canceled 400 departures, and 40 incoming flights were diverted to other airports because of the storm.

Southwest Airlines, meanwhile, canceled more than 40 flights at Dallas Love Field, while American Airlines canceled all flights through Tuesday evening at Dallas-Fort Worth, one of the world’s busiest airports.

The announcement, made via Twitter, was likely to affect American flights in other parts of the country. In all, American and its American Eagle partner airline canceled 234 outbound flights, according to a statement from American.

Taken from CNN Twitter account: @cnnbrk


Twitter
4th April 202